Dog Talk

December 30th, 2016 at 2:42:45 PM permalink
Face
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Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: odiousgambit
your new pup?


Tis =) Just passed the 24hr mark, and things are going gangbusters so far.

More to type but on phone and this thing needs a walk
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
December 30th, 2016 at 3:40:44 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10396
What kind of dog is it, looks like a pit bull.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
December 30th, 2016 at 5:10:17 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 652
Quote: Evenbob
What kind of dog is it, looks like a pit bull.


The body looks like it is mixed with a Rhodesian Ridgeback.
December 30th, 2016 at 5:54:47 PM permalink
Face
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After all the talk and advice, I went a researched a bunch, creating a list of the "definitely", the "absolutely not", and a big grey area open to any ol' mutt. Mama spent some time trolling pounds and the like, sending me pics almost wholly consisting of dogs I didn't care for. In my infrequent searches, I found just one that piqued my interest. But come Xmas time, she had found one that she "was gonna take a look at, but didn't think I wanted". After asking her what it was and getting a mistaken and poorly pronounced name, I clarified and asked "Rhodisian Ridgeback?" to which she replied "That's it!"

And that's what sat at #1 on my list.

The first hour he was skittish as hell. If not for his age, I'd have thought he was possibly abused. But after a bit of cooing and showing there was no threat, he began to warm up a bit. He's a curious cat, but so far responds well to instruction tone. Soft coos will bring him in, sharp bass will get him to cease whatever he's doing immediately. It's bit easy now on account of his fright, but so far, so good.

His first dog encounter changed him. It was his size but 9mths, and he went right to it. Initial sniffs, a few muted barks, a few strains against the leash, but perfect in my eyes. Got him to stop straining and it was like a switch flipped. Whereas before he slunk through the snow like a wolf, he began a head up and chest out trot after the encounter. One side of the road, up and over the bank, look around. Other side of the road, up and over, look around. It was fun to watch.

He nailed a deer trail straight off. Has that front-foot-up posture when he gets something in his head, similar to a pointing dog on the trail. Made me giggle. But sure enough, when he found it, he was on it. I could obviously see it, and he sure enough was on it and following it, looking around as if he expected a deer to manifest from the gloom. I was quite entertained.

Today he's much more comfortable. Still gets that "please don't hurt me" stance and look when I get up and come toward him, but he's also displaying a lot more puppiness at random. I was about to type that he was currently playing with a toy grandma got him, but as I turned to look, he was standing up right behind me and I got a face washing. Things are going well.

I crate him at night and during work, with mama stopping by midday for food, attention, and walks. He'll whine briefly, perhaps sound off with <5 puppy barks, and then he just goes down. So maybe it's "so far, really good". Certainly no complaints as of yet, except for the random nag reminding me I'm gonna have to shoot this thing some day =p

I really like him. And in case Nareed checks in, no, I haven't relegated him to "kitchen only" =)
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
December 30th, 2016 at 6:35:11 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10396
All a dog owner needs to know is, the dog
wants to please you more than anything
else in the world. He wants to be comfortble
in your world, so he needs to know his place
in your world. Your dog is learning his place,
once he finds it, finds what you expect of him,
things will be cool.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
December 31st, 2016 at 4:38:04 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 70
Posts: 1493
Quote: Face
I'm gonna have to shoot this thing some day =p


Having had to do that sort of thing, I don't recommend it [putting it down yourself when it's time]. Use a vet. There's something about having bonded to a creature and then having to do this yourself - speaking for myself anyway, it haunts you.

That's the trouble with dogs, they don't live long enough.
Mustard:You like Kipling, Miss Scarlet? Sure, I'll eat anything [from movie]
December 31st, 2016 at 11:58:47 AM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 3062
Quote: Evenbob
All a dog owner needs to know is, the dog
wants to please you more than anything
else in the world. He wants to be comfortble
in your world, so he needs to know his place
in your world. Your dog is learning his place,
once he finds it, finds what you expect of him,
things will be cool.


Pretty much. I love that (so far) he's not very mischievous. He got into the garbage last night, which i keep in just a bag on the floor. I grabbed him on the spot, pointed, and just gave a stern but quiet "No!". I let him go and he backed up with head and ears down. Pointed again with another "No!". Left the strip of beef fat dangling right where it was and walked out of the kitchen. It's still there these 20hrs later, he hasn't touched it. Ditto for my shoe which he just began chewing. One "No" and he went and found his bone instead.

He's pretty mellow and quiet, too, which i obviously love. I expected much more puppy out of him, but while he'll bark when I enter, or when someone stops by, or after I've stopped playing with him, it's just another 5 bark affair before he's over it and on to find something to do. And his alert barks are more of a "huff" sound as opposed to a sharp bark. Perfect =)

Now I REALLY can't wait for the weather to turn. All the fishing and hiking is gonna be so much better. And I reckon i should take OG's advice and get him gun strong, instead of gun scared.

Quote: odiousgambit
Having had to do that sort of thing, I don't recommend it [putting it down yourself when it's time]. Use a vet. There's something about having bonded to a creature and then having to do this yourself - speaking for myself anyway, it haunts you.

That's the trouble with dogs, they don't live long enough.


I dunno, I'm not sure "haunting" is avoidable. I have done the vet once, and the thought of the thing terrified in that sterile environment is my own haunt that I've never been able to shake. Hopefully, I'll have 10yrs+ to make that decision.

Any of y'all familiar with feeding dogs raw meat? I figured it's worked for 5,000 yrs, and would enjoy toting a gun for purpose again. I'd also fancy getting it some unprocessed, pure stuff for $0.05 a pop; I'm just not too familiar with transmissible disease / parasite issues that could stem from the practice. We're talking rodent / fish here, I wouldn't be feeding it foxes or coyote or any other cousin that could increase that chance. And no, I also don't mean exclusively, as I'm aware their diet requires more. But as a supplement... comments?
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
December 31st, 2016 at 12:37:00 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10396
I give my dog raw beef and burger
sometimes, not a lot though. He
loves the beef bones but you can't
hardly find them anymore.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
December 31st, 2016 at 1:55:52 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 652
Quote: Face

I dunno, I'm not sure "haunting" is avoidable. I have done the vet once, and the thought of the thing terrified in that sterile environment is my own haunt that I've never been able to shake. Hopefully, I'll have 10yrs+ to make that decision.



Just so you know there is another option. When I put my last dog down I had the vet come to the house and I think it was much better for the dog, and it was better for me too.
December 31st, 2016 at 2:05:17 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 115
Posts: 4549
Dogs don't need variety apparently.

Quote:
Once you find a food that works well for your dog, stick with it. Changing types or brands of food can make your dog sick.

If you do need to change his food, do it slowly over a few days. Increase the amount of the new food and decrease the amount of the old food each day.


http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/healthy-dog-tips-13/rm-quiz-dog-food

If the above is right, it suggests, that if you do vary his diet keep it in small amounts or do it so regularly so he's used to it.
No one has ever proven I am not God.