Computer Help Desk ...

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September 29th, 2018 at 7:07:00 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10142
Quote: Evenbob
I had no idea, I thought that stuff was on my machine, not on theirs.

LOL

September 29th, 2018 at 10:46:01 AM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 121
Posts: 15568
Quote: Pacomartin
LOL]


I didn't have Chrome in 2013 when
I did this last. You lost all your bookmarks
when you got a new computer, unless
you copied them.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
October 11th, 2018 at 12:37:38 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 121
Posts: 15568
Sometimes it's too easy. Ordered an LG external
disc player on Tue, laptops have no built in optical
drives anymore, they take up too much room.

$25 on Amazon, 3500 reviews, got it today, it's
the size of a dvd case. Plugged it into the
laptop, downloaded a free dvd player app (VLC),
put in a disc and it worked immediately.

Hooray. Now we'll see how long it lasts.

If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
October 11th, 2018 at 3:07:08 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10142
Quote: Evenbob
laptops have no built in optical drives anymore, they take up too much room.


Some of the new ones have no hard drives either, they use too much battery power.


eMMC is short for "embedded Multi-Media Controller" and refers to a package consisting of both flash memory and a flash memory controller integrated on the same silicon die.
October 11th, 2018 at 3:35:18 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 121
Posts: 15568
Quote: Pacomartin
Some of the new ones have no hard drives either, they use too much battery power.


What I'm experiencing now is what a guy
who was an adult in 1948 must have went
through in 1968. In 48 all you had were
small B/W TV screens, poor quality, not
much to watch. A scant 20 years later,
1968, there were 27" color TV's and every
show was in vivid color.

20 years ago, 1998, was primitive for computers
compared to now. What we can do now, stream
movies and have handheld computers we call
smartphones, we're unheard of in 98. Just like
big screen full color TV was in 1948.


If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
October 11th, 2018 at 6:17:08 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 54
Posts: 6398
Now the limiting factor seems to be power and power sources.

Many bitcoin miners install Adobe Flash updates but soak up power and CPU cycles.

Some locations have induction charging but coffee shops, hotels and restaurants don't always upgrade their power sources so charges can be slow and spotty.

People still seem to carry emergency usb power sources if their batter drain is often high.
October 12th, 2018 at 3:34:47 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10142
John Walson Sr. (19151993), from Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania (80 miles from Philadelphia), invented cable TV in the spring of 1948. He was trying to sell televisions and people were mesmerized by them, tiny as they were. But he used to put them in his truck and drive them up a nearby hill where they could get a signal.He figured out that if he put an antenna on the hill and ran a cable to his store, he could sell more televisions. On the way he ran branch cables to some nearby homes where he sold the signal for $2 a month. The signal was very spotty when it rained, so he tried coaxial cable which worked much better.
The acronym CATV meant community antenna television, and was modified to cable TV in the 1970s when HBO and TBS debuted.

Quote: Evenbob
In 48 all you had were small B/W TV screens, poor quality, not much to watch.


The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran on CBS from June 20, 1948.

Welcome Aboard featured Martin and Lewis on premier episode October 3, 1948

The first Ford Theatre on U.S. television appeared on October 17, 1948. It was an hour-long drama, broadcast live, as was most television of the era. This series used primarily Broadway actors.

Kraft Television Theatre was a prestige show for NBC, it launched the careers of more than a few actors, directors and playwrights, including future Emmy-winning and Academy Award-nominated actress Hope Lange. Actors on the series included James Dean, Janet De Gore, Colleen Dewhurst, Anne Francis, Lee Grant, Helen Hayes, Jack Lemmon, Grace Kelly, Jack Klugman, Cloris Leachman, Sam Levene, Patrick McVey, Michael Higgins, John Newland, Paul Newman, Leslie Nielsen, Anthony Perkins, Judson Pratt, Lee Remick, George C. Scott, Rod Steiger, Joan Tompkins (her first television role), and Joanne Woodward.
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