Gigafactory

May 14th, 2015 at 5:37:02 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 677
Posts: 7752
Quote: Evenbob
Because we have gas stove and water heater, this lets me use those boxes for more circuits in the house.


I was under the impression that you need one master box with fuses for each sub-box. The master box should have the Amp rating for the entire house.

How many kilowatts do you use in a year?
May 14th, 2015 at 5:57:09 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 106
Posts: 10696
The pic is of the master box. The side
boxes have 2 fuses each and can be
shut off individually.

KWH a year? Not many, I don't run much
here. Probably 500-600 a month.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
May 14th, 2015 at 6:13:20 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 106
Posts: 10696
Quote: Pacomartin
Even the oldest type with only 12 spaces. So the first question is do you have circuit breaker panel or simply fuses?


This is the 200 amp box in the barn.

If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
May 14th, 2015 at 7:11:26 PM permalink
kenarman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 3
Posts: 814
Quote: Pacomartin
Between 1950 and 1965, the 60-amp service panel became widely accepted and preferred. This panel was mounted inside a gray metal cabinet and featured a 240-volt feed.

I believe that Circuit breaker panels only permit a minimum of 100-amp . Even the oldest type with only 12 spaces. So the first question is do you have circuit breaker panel or simply fuses?


The small panels are rated for 100 Amps but you can put a smaller main breaker in them of 60 or 70 amps (or less) for a non residential application. The Canadian electrical code now requires a 100 Amp minimum service for a residential application I am not familar with the American code.
"There is no sin but ignorance" Christopher Marlow
May 14th, 2015 at 10:57:48 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4312
Quote: AZDuffman
Until they can find a way to charge that 200 mile range in less than 15 minutes the practicality is not there.
You don't have to "charge" a battery if you can do an "instant swap" in the time it takes to down a cup of coffee.

Some of those huge factories are programmed so that robots "jiggle" their pathways a tiny bit so as to not wear the floor in any particular pattern.
May 15th, 2015 at 2:41:50 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 98
Posts: 6188
Quote: Fleastiff
You don't have to "charge" a battery if you can do an "instant swap" in the time it takes to down a cup of coffee.


In a perfect world. I saw the video Musk put out. But when the vehicle gets older and the bolts and other fittings get corroded it will not work so smooth. And do not underestimate the space needed for all the batteries to be swapped.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
May 15th, 2015 at 3:03:28 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 677
Posts: 7752
Quote: kenarman
The small panels are rated for 100 Amps but you can put a smaller main breaker in them of 60 or 70 amps (or less) for a non residential application. The Canadian electrical code now requires a 100 Amp minimum service for a residential application I am not familar with the American code.


NEC 230.79(C) does require a minimum of 100 Amp, but I don't know if that means older homes must be upgraded. Obviously Evenbob's home insurers inspect his home and have not denied him insurance.
May 15th, 2015 at 8:15:23 AM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 106
Posts: 10696
Quote: Pacomartin
Obviously Evenbob's home insurers inspect his home and have not denied him insurance.


Never had one in here, they never ask
about anything. Have had the same
agent for 25 years.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
May 15th, 2015 at 9:45:15 AM permalink
kenarman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 3
Posts: 814
Quote: Pacomartin
NEC 230.79(C) does require a minimum of 100 Amp, but I don't know if that means older homes must be upgraded. Obviously Evenbob's home insurers inspect his home and have not denied him insurance.


I have written reports on several older homes in which the insurer had wanted an upgrade to 100 Amps. If I demonstrated that the wiring was basically unchanged from it's original installation and the Canadian Electrical Code demand for the premise came in under the main breaker rating (typically 70A in older homes) then the home still met the current code requirements and the insurer would allow them to remain.

In the picture EB posted it looks like the fuses are all green which would mean they are 30 A and the wiring connected to them is not sized for 30 A so he should hope he doesn't get an inspection. It is a dangerous situtation that an electrician would have to report/fix to avoid liability.
"There is no sin but ignorance" Christopher Marlow
May 15th, 2015 at 1:02:53 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 677
Posts: 7752
Quote: kenarman
In the picture EB posted it looks like the fuses are all green which would mean they are 30 A and the wiring connected to them is not sized for 30 A so he should hope he doesn't get an inspection.


The same thing at my parent's house. All the fuzes were 30 Amps, which means they were installed before 1977. I insisted that they should replace them with 15 Amp fuzes, which bugs my parents since they burn out sometimes. The home was inspected at least five times, and the inspectors never noticed.

I get crap for creating problems, but they walk like tortoises. They are not going to outrun a fire in the walls.

Quote: Evenbob
KWH a year? Not many, I don't run much here. Probably 500-600 a month.

Evenbob should put his dryer in the barn, and switch his house to solar cells. He should be able to run his lights and his computer.

An average of 700W device running 24/7 is 511kWh per month.