Gigafactory

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August 12th, 2017 at 1:45:06 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 319
Posts: 10858
Quote: Pacomartin
As the refrigerator is now 90 years old and has not broken we find no particular reason to replace it.


1) does it have a mechanical lock with a handle?

2) Doesn't it draw too much power? You might save money by buying a new used one.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
August 12th, 2017 at 3:03:17 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 705
Posts: 8134
Quote: Nareed
You might save money by buying a new used one.


The 1928 refrigerator does not draw a lot of power, probably because it does not have a freezer.

As for the 1994 refrigerator, Mr Electricity says yes, it should be traded in based on energy usage.

Quote: Mr Electricity
Should you replace your current fridge?
If your fridge was made before 2001, then yes, you should almost certainly trade it in. Older fridges are wildly ineffecient. The best modern models use less than half of what 1993-2000 fridges used. For older fridges it's even more striking: Replacing a 1992 fridge with a modern Energy Star model could save $1400 in electricity costs over the useful life of the fridge.


There is also a refrigerator in the basement probably manufactured in 1997. I really think the smartest thing to do is to buy less food and simply throw this refrigerator away.


A 16.6 cubic foot refrigerator (no freezer) costing uses only 318 kWh per year while a similarly priced 18 cubic foot refrigerator and freezer uses 404 kWh per year. So it doesn't seem like it is worth to forego owning a freezer and buying only fresh food.
August 12th, 2017 at 3:25:40 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 719
Quote: Pacomartin


As for the 1994 refrigerator, Mr Electricity says yes, it should be traded in based on energy usage.



I have an old side by side refrigerator in my garage that just gave out last night. My house is about 20 years old and I assume this was the original. In the summer that things runs almost constantly because it is not unusual for it to be 120 degrees in the garage. Hopefully I can find a used replacement for it that is only 10 or less years old. The savings running it will probably pay for it in a year or so.
August 12th, 2017 at 6:31:13 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 705
Posts: 8134
Quote: Nareed
1) does it have a mechanical lock with a handle?


The Monitor Top GE refrigerators were in production from 1927 to 1937. So this one was from the first two years.


Some people are paying obscene amounts of money for restored vintage appliances.

They had no freezers until the 1940's. They just had an ice cube tray.
August 13th, 2017 at 2:54:04 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 3121
Quote: reno
Quote: Face
I could be wrong (I'm not a learned fellow) but I'm still convinced the guy in Utah that's still driving his '64 Belvedere is the pinnacle of green living, precisely because of the unseen price of manufacturing. Just that alone, the resources used to create a new model, has got to skew things quite out of favor with the new stuff. ANY new stuff.




Apparently the manufacturing of a new Ford Fusion creates about 17 tons of CO2. A car which gets 30 mpg pollutes about 4.35 tons of CO2 annually, (whereas a car which gets 40 mpg only burns 3.25 tons annually.) So over the course of say, 12 years, the 30 mpg car pollutes 52.2 tons of CO2.

Correct me if I'm wrong, Face, but a '64 Belvedere probably gets about 15 mpg?


If it's tuned properly. And you drive like an octogenarian. And going downhill ;)

Yours are some of those stats I was asking for, but what of your side? What does it cost to mine coal, drill for natural gas, erect a dam or maintain a nuke? What of the creation and maintenance of all the wires to get the juice from there to home? It's great to look so far as to include the cost of even getting gas to the pumps, say nothing of the cost of what you use. But where's the other sides'?

It seems as plain as day that both sides have numerous costs associated. It seems plain as day that neither can hold themselves as "pure". And it's as obvious as the nose on your face that the main factor in this world of responsible transportation options is simply the actors who have billions at stake.

The way I see it, we are owed the honest information required to conduct ourselves the way our beliefs state. I might take church at the altar of the V8, but I do enjoy a spot of minimalism. And these NIMBY type rigs and mines aren't built in suburbia; they're plopped down where I hunt and fish. And I don't need to prove human global warming to know that exhaust kills the very things I've based my life around, the flora and fauna that makes home "Home".

It's too bad that things such as "honesty" and "complete information" have no real bearing on things. There's no real freedom to choose, it's all just a game of manipulation.
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
August 14th, 2017 at 4:31:31 AM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4573
Freedom is the choice to not be manipulated whether it be by political correctness or opposing views.
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