Tale Told by an Idiot, full of Sound and Fury

December 5th, 2015 at 11:51:28 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 661
Posts: 7569


I suppose I could post this trailer under movies, but since the Wizard subtitled this section as sound and fury it seems more appropriate to go here.

Marion Cotillard and Michael Fassbender play the famous Mr and Mrs.
December 6th, 2015 at 12:01:12 AM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10370
Is Shakespeare the most talented man who
ever lived? He was from a time when the
Church ruled everything. Are any of his plays
about religion.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
December 6th, 2015 at 3:43:58 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 70
Posts: 1492
Quote: Evenbob
Is Shakespeare the most talented man who
ever lived? He was from a time when the
Church ruled everything. Are any of his plays
about religion.


The Elizabethan era was a bit on the wild side. The English separation from Rome had take place some time before and it's as if the population was enjoying themselves. I would say Shakespeare felt free to write whatever he wanted; they say "A Midsummer Night's Dream" takes pokes at Elizabeth, even, in spots.
Mustard:You like Kipling, Miss Scarlet? Sure, I'll eat anything [from movie]
December 6th, 2015 at 1:42:51 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 661
Posts: 7569
Quote: Evenbob
Are any of his plays about religion.


Not really. Textual search says he used the word "God" 1,178 times in his work, but they are often as exclamations or on about the same level as references to pagan spirits.
"As flies to wanton boys are we to th' gods. They kill us for their sport." - The Earl of Gloucester in King Lear, Act 4 Scene 1
"The Prince of Darkness is a gentleman. Modo hes called, and Mahu." - Edgar in King Lear, Act 3 Scene 4
"O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you. She is the fairies' midwife," - Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet

You could end up being executed for being Catholic, so we presume that Shakespeare never expressed Catholic sentiments in public.

But since every possible aspect of Shakespeare's life has been analyzed thousands of times, there is a full article in wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_views_of_William_Shakespeare
William Birch of Oxford University was, in 1848, probably the first to suggest that Shakespeare could be an atheist, based on his interpretation of sentiments expressed in the works.

Since Shakespeare (or at least a version without the vulgar bits) , the bible, and Pilgrim's Progress were often the only books in the home in America, many scholars have trouble believing that Shakespeare, just past the crest of his greatest accomplishments, was not invited to be one of the translators of the King James bible. More contemporary scholars believe that Shakespeare may have been considered on par with a popular TV writer of today, and it is no surprise that he was not invited to be on the team that did the translation. In any case, the names of all the scholars who did the translation are unknown. The coincidence that the 46th Psalm has the words "shake" and "spear" as the 46th words from the beginning and the end is seen by some people as a clue that Shakespeare left in his work. He was roughly age 46 when the translations were done. Other people say that if you look hard enough, you will always find some coincidences.

Quote: Psalm 46King James Version (KJV)

1 God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
2 Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea;
3 Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah.
4 There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holy place of the tabernacles of the most High.
5 God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early.
6 The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: he uttered his voice, the earth melted.
7 The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.
8 Come, behold the works of the Lord, what desolations he hath made in the earth.
9 He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire.
10 Be still, and know that I am God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth.
11 The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.


"The Family Shakespeare" (the version without the vulgar bits) was edited by Thomas Bowdler, (11 July 1754 24 February 1825), an English physician and philanthropist, intended to be more appropriate for 19th century women and children than the original. None of that stuff about having a hard time getting an erection when you are drunk, or sneaking the word "c-nt" into the dialogue.

There was a famous Shakespeare Theater in Washington DC. One of the aids to Jesse Helms gave them an angry phone call about inserting vulgar bits into Macbeth, but the theater company assured her that those bits were already there.

Quote: Porter's speech in Macbeth for comic relief
'Faith sir, we were carousing till the second cock: and drink, sir, is a great provoker of three things.

Marry, sir, nose-painting, sleep, and urine. Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes; it provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance: therefore, much drink may be said to be an equivocator with lechery: it makes him, and it mars him; it sets him on, and it takes him off; it persuades him, and disheartens him; makes him stand to, and not stand to; in conclusion, equivocates him in a sleep, and, giving him the lie, leaves him.