Aeromexico has competition on flight to Tokyo from MC

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April 9th, 2016 at 12:46:35 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 635
Posts: 7227
Quote: Nareed
I suppose they could declare a fare war. Or fight an undeclared one (same difference). They might also advertise more in Japan. Perhaps they may offer lower fares only on business class. Then, too, if Japanese business people like making the most of a jaunt across the Pacific, say if they fly to Mexico and then to Central/South America or to the US or Canada, AM is in a better position to offer them connecting flights on such routes.


The nonstops between Asia and Latin America are so few, that I doubt they want to go to fare wars. There are connections from Auckland New Zealand to Buenos Aires and Santiago, but connecting through Auckland is a long trip especially if you want to go beyond BA and Santiago.

Most Asian passengers connect through LAX, IAH, or SFO, but AeroMexico feels that they can make cheaper connections via Mexico City.

AeroMexico's full buy is 20 Dreamliners (10 787-8 and 10 787-9). They are replacing their historic fleet of 20 B767 and B777 which were delivered from 1991 to 2006 (all B767s returned to lessor).

7 Boeing 767-200
9 Boeing 767-300
4 Boeing 777-200 (still flying to Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo and Madrid)

European Airlines tend to have nonstops to South American cities, but Asian Airlines do not have that option in most cases. For instance there may never ever be an airplane that can cover the distance from Shanghai to Buenos Aires nonstop.
19,600 km Pudong International Airport, Shanghai, CN (PVG) to Ministro Pistarini, Buenos Aires, AR (EZE) nonstop
19,700 km Auckland Intl Arpt, Auckland, NZ (AKL) as an intermediate stop
20,250 km Los Angeles Intl, Los Angeles, CA (LAX) as an intermediate stop
20,290 km Juarez Intl, Mexico City, MX (MEX) as an intermediate stop

So such travelers must make a fuel stop somewhere. While Auckland is the smallest physical deviation, it may not be the cheapest.

March 17th, 2017 at 5:42:59 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 635
Posts: 7227
Quote: Pacomartin
Aeromexico now has competition on flight to Tokyo from Mexico City. All Nippon Airlines is flying the exact same model plane Dreamliner 787-8 as Aeromexico, but with considerably fewer seats.



ANA s having major problems with it's Rolls Royce engines on it's Dreamliners. They will replace up to 100 engines as corrosion has been discovered on inside blades.

Analysts blame the problem on an issue cited in the past. Japanese airlines tend to use widebodies on more flights per day of short duration. As you may remember, this operational mode was blamed for the crash of flight JA#123, the horrible crash of the B747 on August 12, 1985 with 520 fatalities and only 4 survivors. The high number of cycles do not necessarily cause crashes, but they wear out parts faster.

Aeromexico selected GEnx Engines to power its Boeing 787 Dreamliner fleet, and passed on the Rolls Royce engines.
March 17th, 2017 at 7:40:22 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 301
Posts: 9740
Quote: Pacomartin
ANA s having major problems with it's Rolls Royce engines on it's Dreamliners. They will replace up to 100 engines as corrosion has been discovered on inside blades.


I assume the blades are a metal alloy, though corrosion can and does happen on other materials.

And are they replacing whole engines, or just the affected parts?

Quote:
As you may remember, this operational mode was blamed for the crash of flight JA#123, the horrible crash of the B747 on August 12, 1985


As I recall, part of the cause was a tail strike months or years before the accident, which wasn't quite properly fixed.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
March 17th, 2017 at 10:29:03 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 635
Posts: 7227
Quote: Nareed
I assume the blades are a metal alloy, though corrosion can and does happen on other materials.

And are they replacing whole engines, or just the affected parts?


They initially will receive new turbine blades, but eventually the entire engines will all be replaced in a process that may take the next three years.

The new engines will be Rolls Royce and not GEnx.

Quote: Nareed
As I recall, part of the cause was a tail strike months or years before the accident, which wasn't quite properly fixed.


The bad repair would fail after a given number of cycles . But the plane was flying 6 times a day, way more than a the single round trip per day of most B747 schedules.
The plane had 25,000 airframe hours and more than 18,800 cycles (one cycle equals one takeoff and landing).

The ultimate diagnostic was the faulty repair done seven year before (fixing the aircraft used two separate splice plates) , but under normal circumstances the bad repair may have taken so many decades to fail that the airframe would likely have been retired before failure.

Hiroo Tominaga, a JAL maintenance manager, and Susumu Tajima, an engineer who had inspected and cleared the aircraft as flight-worthy, both killed themselves to apologize for the accident.
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