Super cheap way to get to Europe

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August 6th, 2016 at 8:37:34 AM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4708
Fleastiff's two cents worth:

Iceland appears to have a highly intelligent,well educated and athletic population. The economy is rebounding, Russian Mafia influence has increased as has prostitution, an almost unknown activity formerly.

I'd be worried about Russian influence over any lottery.

Cheaper way: get a rickety old boat and good looking young girl, set sail ... file weekly you tube videos and get sponsors. You arrive in Europe with a pretty and now pregnant girl and lots of money or else you drown.

Beware some Iceland food fads, particularly those around late December, early January ... some strange stats for males conceived in that period.

Iceland has Apps that warn youngsters if they are in the company of someone a bit too consanguinous.

Iceland is focusing on nuclear power for some strange reason.
August 6th, 2016 at 9:07:16 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
Posts: 8413
Quote: Fleastiff
Iceland is focusing on nuclear power for some strange reason.


Lárus M.K. Ólafsson, a former lawyer for the National Energy Authority (NEA) revealed that General Electric once approach Iceland with the idea of building a nuclear power plant in the Westman Islands. In 1958, the American power company and defence contractor General Electric approached Icelandic authorities with a pitch for a nuclear power plant in Iceland. “Three separate reports were done on the matter in 1959, an economic plan, a general explanation of the product, and then different ways in which it could be implemented. But then the idea more or less fizzled out.”

Quote: Fleastiff
Iceland has Apps that warn youngsters if they are in the company of someone a bit too consanguinous.


Iceland has the most consanguinous population on Earth. The app is a bit of a novelty, as the concern about children of consanguinous unions is a bit overblown. Most people know their first cousins, and the children of 2nd cousins are not at risk in a way more than many other commonly assumed risks (like the mother being over age 35). If a casual sex results in a child you have lots of problems.

Queen Elizabeth II and her husband are both 2nd cousins once removed through Queen Victoria (died 1901) and they are also 3rd cousins through the King of Denmark (died 1906).
August 6th, 2016 at 10:15:49 AM permalink
Wizard
Administrator
Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 141
Posts: 3117
Quote: Aussie
I believe you can get a free stopover in Reykjavik too which would appeal to plenty of tourists I'd think. You normally have to buy a fare from a more expensive fare bucket to be able to have stopovers so that's a nice feature and probably a draw card.


I did that when I flew between Baltimore and Hamburg in 2000. Spent a few days in and around Reykjavik. Wish I would have had more time to see other parts of Iceland.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
August 6th, 2016 at 3:36:39 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
Posts: 8413
Quote: Wizard
I did that when I flew between Baltimore and Hamburg in 2000. Spent a few days in and around Reykjavik. Wish I would have had more time to see other parts of Iceland.


It may be a free layover, but it seems like a pretty expensive place to visit. I see rooms for $250 a night in 3 star hotels.


Captain Kirk is supposed to be dating a girl from Iceland.


Less than 7000' to the highest summit, but a lot of hidden crevasses so it is dangerous.
August 6th, 2016 at 4:45:20 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4708
May I suggest 'couch surfing' websites for Iceland, Germany, Denmark and Norway. Not so sure about France. And of course there are always WWOOFERS.

You could be a woofer in Norway for longer than your visa allowed you to stay ... and still not spend 250 dollars.

You cold couch surf in Iceland or Germany for a week and spend about 250.
August 8th, 2016 at 9:31:38 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 324
Posts: 11135
Quote: Pacomartin
The Low Cost Transatlantic Narrow Body competition seems to be gearing up.


For the life of me, I can't recall the explanation given in several aviation blogs as to why low-cost long haul travel is not profitable. While the record of failure is ample (Laker Air, Air Madrid, and others), lately too many airlines are getting into the game. Besides WOW, there's Norwegian and its subsidiary Norwegian Air Shuttle, not to mention Jet Blue seems to be eyeing the market as well.

Norwegian owns some 787s, but operates some transatlantic flights with 737s as well.

We'll regret than Boeing never developed the twin-aisle small jet, as they contemplated with the 7J7, and the clean slate to replace the 737 NG before they settled on the MAX.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
August 8th, 2016 at 10:41:58 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
Posts: 8413
Quote: Nareed
We'll regret than Boeing never developed the twin-aisle small jet, as they contemplated with the 7J7, and the clean slate to replace the 737 NG before they settled on the MAX.


Prompted by the development of the Airbus A320, which incorporated ground-breaking technologies such as fly-by-wire, in 1991 Boeing initiated development of an updated series of aircraft. The 737 Next Generation (NG) program was announced on November 17, 1993. The first NG to roll out was on December 8, 1996. A total of 5,834 737NG aircraft have been delivered by the end of March 2016, with more than 7,000 ordered.

Since 2006, Boeing has discussed replacing the 737 with a "clean-sheet" design that could follow the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In 2010, Airbus, launched the Airbus A320neo, which boasted new engines which improve fuel burn and operating efficiency. The decision was met with positive reaction by many airlines and they began making major orders for the aircraft. In January of 2011, Southwest threatened to become an all Airbus fleet. On August 30, 2011, the Boeing's board of directors approved the 737 MAX project. The "clean sheet" narrowbody is delayed until 2030.
August 8th, 2016 at 11:41:57 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 324
Posts: 11135
Quote: Pacomartin
The "clean sheet" narrowbody is delayed until 2030.


Unless, it would seem, Airbus does some other thing with the A320 family that Boeing can copy with the 737...

Tweaking an existing design is easier, and cheaper, than developing a new design. The problem is that innovation comes mostly from new designs rather than the tweaking of old ones. The 737 was designed in the 60s, if memory serves.

To be sure the 757 was a clean slate narrow body design released in the 80s. Perhaps the disappointing sale numbers made Boeing partially allergic to new narrow body/small plane ventures.

IN the meantime, Bombardier is innovating with the C-series in the small plane market. They could scale up the C-300 to compete with the 737 and A320.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
August 8th, 2016 at 1:32:23 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
Posts: 8413
Quote: Nareed
IN the meantime, Bombardier is innovating with the C-series in the small plane market. They could scale up the C-300 to compete with the 737 and A320.


From Wall Street Journal


The first CS100 was delivered to Swiss Global Air Lines on June 29, 2016. Delta airlines ordered 75 of the Bombardier CS100 with deliveries begin 2018. Replacing MD-88 and older CRJ aircraft.

If they are replacing the MD-88 (147 ft 8 in) it looks like the CS100 (114 ft 9 in) is a considerably smaller aircraft.
Delta MD-88
First 16 recliner seats
Economy 108 standard seats
Delta Comfort+ 25 standard seats
August 8th, 2016 at 1:52:07 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 749
Paco, do you know what the fuel burn rate for each one is per passenger mile? I would think that would be a huge factor.
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