Delta - Aeromexico joint venture approved by US Department of Transportation

December 22nd, 2016 at 3:10:10 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Delta has agreed to divest slots at Mexico City and JFK to receive approval

Delta and Aeromexico said in a joint regulatory filing in November 2015 that DOT's conditions were unprecedented, arbitrary, and untethered to any potential alleged harms related to the [JV]. The airlines added, "The proposed conditions would jeopardize the sizeable consumer and economic benefits that [DOT] recognized would flow from the proposed [JV]. Moreover, they would severely diminish the economic viability of the [JV], and would compel [Delta and Aeromexico] to reconsider undertaking it."

But despite this rhetoric, the airlines eventually accepted the terms.

Delta is increasing it's ownership stake in AeroMexico to 49% and views the fast growing Mexico market as the future of air travel in North America to offset the more mature USA market.

Aeromexico has linked Mexico city to Shanghai-Pudong, and Tokyo-Narita, but clearly the joint venture intends to link Mexico with other Asian cities via Delta's fast developing hubs such as Seattle.



AeroMexico flies nonstop to the four European airports in Madrid, London-Heathrow, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, and now Amsterdam. The alliance will permit more destinations in Europe by connecting through Atlanta.
December 22nd, 2016 at 6:36:00 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Pacomartin
Delta is increasing it's ownership stake in AeroMexico to 49%


Remarkable, there has been no outcry from the irrational left, no rending of garments, and no demands to stop this latest gringo raping of our national sovereignty over the "loss" of Mexico's flagship airline.

ON other news, I think Ryanair's shares of Viva have been bought off by the Mexican partners in the venture.

And on other developments, Interjet's going ULCC in attitude while not lowering prices. Their lowest fare doesn't let you pick an assigned seat. Fair enough. But it also doesn't let you print a boarding pass beforehand. This sucks when you have an early flight, and must allow an extra hour to stand in line at the counter or the kiosks to get it.

I'd be ok with having the system assign you a seat on a boarding pass printed the day before at home. The extra hour is a killer. Think waking up at 3:30 rather than 4:30, after working all day until 10 pm or so. A measly hour counts a lot.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
December 22nd, 2016 at 8:11:08 AM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Nareed

I'd be ok with having the system assign you a seat on a boarding pass printed the day before at home. The extra hour is a killer. Think waking up at 3:30 rather than 4:30, after working all day until 10 pm or so. A measly hour counts a lot.


We have a long flight on Delta tonight and there are no upgrades available. They are already begging people to give up their seat and the flight is more than 12 hours away. It is going to be packed in like cattle tonight with all of the holiday travelers.
December 22nd, 2016 at 10:21:28 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 636
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Quote: Nareed
And on other developments, Interjet's going ULCC in attitude while not lowering prices. Their lowest fare doesn't let you pick an assigned seat. Fair enough. But it also doesn't let you print a boarding pass beforehand. This sucks when you have an early flight, and must allow an extra hour to stand in line at the counter or the kiosks to get it.


That seems backwards to me. Allegiant Airlines (an ULCC) charges $5 to get a boarding pass at the airport. You save money by printing your boarding pass at home. At the same time they charge you a $14.99 call center fee to order your ticket and involve a live person on the telephone. I figure their ultimate goal is to have no direct contact between a clerk or office employee and a passenger so they don't have to hire as many people.

But, frankly, I didn't see how Interjet could function being so out of step with the rest of the industry.

On 22 June 2000, representatives of Aeromexico, Air France, Delta Air Lines and Korean Air held a meeting in New York to found SkyTeam. So Delta and Aeromexico have been working together for over 16 years. But after this joint venture begins, they are almost a single company.
December 22nd, 2016 at 4:12:42 PM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 95
Posts: 5616
Quote: DRich
We have a long flight on Delta tonight and there are no upgrades available. They are already begging people to give up their seat and the flight is more than 12 hours away. It is going to be packed in like cattle tonight with all of the holiday travelers.


Remember when we looked forward to flying?




[
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
December 22nd, 2016 at 4:39:25 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 301
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Quote: Pacomartin
That seems backwards to me.


It's positively antediluvian.

What's next? paper tickets on red carbons?

(actually I miss the stack of paper tickets written in blue ink and the red carbons)

Quote:
But, frankly, I didn't see how Interjet could function being so out of step with the rest of the industry.


Labor costs ought to be lower here. Which is not to say they're not costs. Both AM and Interjet have been busy installing check-in kiosks. AM won't even check you in at the counter any more in MEX. The counter is for checking bags only.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.