Little used English words

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March 23rd, 2017 at 12:17:03 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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I was thinking about the word pair opposite & apposite. Does anyone use "apposite" in writing or speech?
March 23rd, 2017 at 1:03:10 PM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
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only when apposite - which has turned out to be never.
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March 23rd, 2017 at 2:19:43 PM permalink
Ayecarumba
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 85
Posts: 1597
I have never used the word. Rather, "appropriate" "applicable" or "matching" instead.
March 24th, 2017 at 6:22:05 AM permalink
zippyboy
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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amused vs. bemused
March 24th, 2017 at 7:21:51 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12536
Quote: Pacomartin
I was thinking about the word pair opposite & apposite. Does anyone use "apposite" in writing or speech?


I don't think I've even come across it.

But given current trends, it should replace "opposite" in no time. You know, like "then" replaced "than" for some insane reason.
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March 24th, 2017 at 5:13:57 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 859
Posts: 10231
Quote: zippyboy
amused vs. bemused


That is a good example!

The original primary meaning of "amuse" was "deceive, cheat" by first occupying the attention. That meaning is now totally obsolete. "Bemuse" retains more of the original meaning of "amuse".

Quote: Nareed
I don't think I've even come across it.


I saw the word "apposite" in an article only recently, and I had to look it up.


A good word is to whip out is "evitable" (which was discussed in "In the Loop" the British political satire. Most people don't know that "eviable" is a word, although they frequently use the word "inevitable".
March 24th, 2017 at 5:46:24 PM permalink
Ayecarumba
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 85
Posts: 1597
Has anyone offered "proffer"
March 24th, 2017 at 6:07:14 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12536
Quote: Pacomartin
I saw the word "apposite" in an article only recently, and I had to look it up.


But is "blain" an English word?
Donald Trump is a fucking liar
March 24th, 2017 at 11:22:03 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 859
Posts: 10231
Quote: Nareed
But is "blain" an English word?


Yes, but I have never seen it used. It is also one of several English spellings of a Gaelic name.

Quote: Ayecarumba
Has anyone offered "proffer"


Not yet, nor has anyone suggested "profer".
March 25th, 2017 at 6:09:36 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12536
Quote: Pacomartin
Yes, but I have never seen it used. It is also one of several English spellings of a Gaelic name.


I saw it used in a Black Widower story by Asimov. One of the characters asks "Is "blain" an English word?"
Donald Trump is a fucking liar
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