Movies that should have had sequels

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May 24th, 2017 at 9:50:22 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 328
Posts: 11352
There are several movies which were reasonably successful but never had sequels.

One that comes easily to mind is "Who framed Roger Rabbit?" It had a unique look, it remains one of the best mixtures of animation and live action, and had engaging characters. Hell, given that Eddie has a backstory, there could have been a prequel.

On the other hand, be careful what you wish for, right? Another visually unique Disney movie, though far from successful, had a sequel that really sucked. I'm talking about "TRON." Great movie, terrible sequel. At that, I'd have forgiven the sequel if they'd done old-style visual effects rather than CGI, or even if they had reproduced the look and feel of the original with CGI.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
May 24th, 2017 at 10:34:43 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Who Framed Roger Rabbit made more than double it's production budget in domestic and 2.5X in foreign sales. Normally that would result in a sequel. Bur Robert Zemeckis (the director was super hot with Back to the Future sequels) and showed no interest in doing a sequel, nor did Bob Hoskins.

In addition the mania for sequels was not as strong in 1988. None of the top 5 movies that year had a sequel, although they all spawned movies that tried to use similar themes.

Rain Man
Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Coming to America
Big
Twins


My bid for the movie that was most likely to result in a sequel, but never did was the low budget comedy, Mrs. Doubtfire in 1993. It was a monstrous worldwide hit.

1 Jurassic Park
2 Mrs. Doubtfire
3 The Fugitive
4 The Firm

Although Boxofficemojo rates Mrs Doubtfire as #95 in tickets sold for all time, the only straight up comedy that sold more tickets was 1963's It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World; 1974's Blazing Saddles; 1984's Ghostbusters; and 1990's Home Alone.

Usually comedies with relatively low budgets result in sequals as the actor's are paid huge salaries. A movie like Roger Rabbit means bringing together a large range of talents for years of difficult work.


1939^ Gone with the Wind
1977^ Star Wars
1965 The Sound of Music
1982^ E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial
1997^ Titanic
1956 The Ten Commandments
1975 Jaws
1965 Doctor Zhivago
1973^ The Exorcist
1937^ Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
2015 Star Wars: The Force Awakens
1961^ 101 Dalmatians
1980^ The Empire Strikes Back
1959 Ben-Hur
2009^ Avatar
1983^ Return of the Jedi
1993^ Jurassic Park
1999^ Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace
1994^ The Lion King
1973 The Sting
1981^ Raiders of the Lost Ark
1967^ The Graduate
1941^ Fantasia
2015 Jurassic World
1972^ The Godfather
1994^ Forrest Gump
1964^ Mary Poppins
1978^ Grease
2012 Marvel's The Avengers
1965 Thunderball
2008^ The Dark Knight
1967^ The Jungle Book
1959^ Sleeping Beauty
1984^ Ghostbusters
2004 Shrek 2
1969 Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
1970 Love Story
2002 Spider-Man
1996^ Independence Day
1990 Home Alone
1940^ Pinocchio
1963 Cleopatra (1963)
1984 Beverly Hills Cop
1964 Goldfinger
1970 Airport
1973 American Graffiti
1953 The Robe
2006 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest
1956 Around the World in 80 Days
1942^ Bambi
1974^ Blazing Saddles
1989 Batman
1945 The Bells of St. Mary's
2003^ The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
2003^ Finding Nemo
1974 The Towering Inferno
2016 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
1950^ Cinderella (1950)
2004 Spider-Man 2
1964 My Fair Lady
1952 The Greatest Show on Earth
1978^ National Lampoon's Animal House
2004^ The Passion of the Christ
2005^ Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith
1985 Back to the Future
2002^ The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
2012 The Dark Knight Rises
1999 The Sixth Sense
1978 Superman
1982 Tootsie
1977 Smokey and the Bandit
2017 Beauty and the Beast (2017)
2016 Finding Dory
1961 West Side Story
2001 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
1955^ Lady and the Tramp
1977^ Close Encounters of the Third Kind
1962^ Lawrence of Arabia
1975 The Rocky Horror Picture Show
1976 Rocky
1946 The Best Years of Our Lives
1972 The Poseidon Adventure
2001^ The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
1996 Twister
1997 Men in Black
1957 The Bridge on the River Kwai
2009 Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen
1963 It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
1960 Swiss Family Robinson
1975 One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
1970 M.A.S.H.
1984 Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
2015 Avengers: Age of Ultron
2002^ Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones
1993 Mrs. Doubtfire
May 24th, 2017 at 10:48:26 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 328
Posts: 11352
Quote: Pacomartin
Who Framed Roger Rabbit made more than double it's production budget in domestic and 2.5X in foreign sales. Normally that would result in a sequel. Bur Robert Zemeckis (the director was super hot with Back to the Future sequels) and showed no interest in doing a sequel, nor did Bob Hoskins.


Yeah, but Disney parks, merchandising, etc.!

It's too late now.

THE movie that is notorious for not having a sequel is Mel Brooks' "History of the World Part One." Yes, I know the lack of a sequel is part of the joke. But there are previews of the non-existent sequel (shown at the end credits).

And speaking of Brooks, there's also no sequel to "Space Balls," even though there is a title for it: "Space Balls 2: The Search for More Money."

I don't recall where I heard this joke: A sequel of "Gone with the Wind" would start with Rhett telling Scarlet, "You know, my dear, perhaps I do give a damn after all."
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
May 24th, 2017 at 12:09:45 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 119
Posts: 5248
I believe animation production has become much more slick/refined since Roger Rabbit because of computer software. They were blending animation into live action which is probably more complex anyway.

Now, one animator at a computer can do better scenes when he/she knows what they are doing than a production team back then.

That might put off a sequel maker.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
May 24th, 2017 at 12:25:54 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 328
Posts: 11352
Quote: rxwine
I believe animation production has become much more slick/refined since Roger Rabbit because of computer software. They were blending animation into live action which is probably more complex anyway.


Pretty much all modern CGI is blending animated computer effects with live action. So...

In Roger Rabbit, the animation looked like animation, as intended, but also as though it were part of the real world. "Space Jam" from around the same time, doesn't look as good. More recently, in the Rocky & Bullwinkle movie, the animated characters almost look realistic. So that's not it, either.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
May 24th, 2017 at 1:25:57 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 119
Posts: 5248
This is what I found:

Quote:
In reality, Roger Rabbit is one of those movies that today could never be made. And even at the time, it seems impossible that Who Framed Roger Rabbit did get made. It was a complicated production, both technically and in terms of the multiple properties that would need to be licensed to achieve the authenticity of the story, using real cartoon characters from history. The film was beset by problems, not just issues with licensing. Spielberg was instrumental in the licensing negotiations, however. Working closely with studios such as Warner Bros. Fleischer Studios, Felix the Cat Productions, Turner Entertainment, and Universal Pictures, Spielberg’s name and smooth negotiating convinced the separate studios to “lend” their characters to the production at an unbelievable flat rate of $5000 per character. That was it. No backends, no residuals, just a one-time flat fee and some good will. And, a few additional stipulations on behalf of the studios for some of their major properties. For instance, Warner Bros. stipulated that their characters such as Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny must receive equal screen time, dialogue, and billing as Disney’s Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse. Spielberg’s feat was unparalleled in Hollywood business history, and he was rewarded well for his efforts, his contract included extensive creative control and a large percentage of the box office profits. Disney maintained merchandising rights, of course.

The film’s production was notoriously over-budget and over-schedule. Disney balked at the originally projected $50 million production and greenlit the film with a $29.9 million budget – even at that cost it was the most expensive animated film ever greenlit. During production, when the budget had escalated past $40 million, Disney’s President at the time, Michael Eisner, nearly shut down production. Jeffrey Katzenberg (now head of Dreamworks Animation) was in charge of Disney Animation at the time and was responsible for talking Eisner out of shuttering production. Spielberg’s draw was said to have helped assuage him as well. Katzenberg argued at the time that hybrid live-action plus animation would save Disney Animation’s ailing, pre-renaissance department.

Post production lasted an additional 14 months, with one of the biggest challenges being rotoscoping all the live action sequences (drawing animation cells over all the live action footage). This proved even more challenging than the technique would otherwise be because of Zemeckis use of dynamic camera movements and the large amount of action shots. ILM also added to the process by completing three lighting layers that were optically printed onto the animation (adding dimensionality), subjecting the characters to the same lighting that already existed in the filmed live-action sequences.

As anyone who’s seen the film knows, it’s tone is quite dark. Though it plays for children, the darker elements, sexual innuendo, drinking, guns, and violence, aren’t the typical fodder for children’s animation. Given the dark nature of the film, and Zemeckis (with Spielberg’s support) unwillingness to adjust the tone, Disney opted to release the film through its Touchstone Pictures banner on June 22nd, 1988. It opened to $11.2 million on only 1,045 screens, going on to earn $156.5 million domestically and an additional $173.25 internationally. Who Framed Roger Rabbit was the second highest grosser of 1988 behind Rain Man.
Zemeckis, of course, would continue to embark throughout his career on technical advancement and experimentation. Not only with the mixing of live-action and animation, but he has also been one of the instrumental directors pushing forward the advancement of performance capture CGI and 3D, with films such as Forrest Gump, The Polar Express and A Christmas Carol. His desire to continually blur the lines between animation and reality has, in fact, become a career-long venture. And, of course, a lot of it began with Roger Rabbit.

Technically, the film was quite the achievement as well. The production utilized VistaVision cameras, a higher resolution, widescreen variant of the 35mm format, some of the same techniques used in VistaVision eventually evolved into 70mm IMAX formats. The cameras were also equipped with motion control technology, allowing for scenes to be shot with the same movements and focal lengths multiple times. On set, rubber mannequins stood in for main cartoon characters to establish sight-lines and give the actors something to act against. However, the voice of Roger Rabbit, Charles Fleischer, insisted on wearing a Roger costume on set and acting out his lines off-camera. Filming, which began on December 2nd, 1986 lasted seven months, with an additional month in LA at Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) for the necessary blue-screen Toontown effects.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit was a rare culmination of business practices, technological achievement, and innovative storytelling. The ridiculously expensive, ultimately $70 million budget, film would go to become a massive grosser, while also winning four Academy Awards, including Best Film Editing, Best Effects (Visual) and Best Effects (Sound Editing), in addition to a Special Achievement Award for animation direction by Richard Williams. The film also received nominations for Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction, and Best Sound. But what the film achieved then is perhaps inconceivable to this day, with the exception of Disney’s recent, Wreck-It Ralph, which perhaps utilized Roger as a template for the teaming of its multiple company gaming properties. But to this day, Roger Rabbit stands as a marvel of studio cooperation, and animation innovation. While the film has aged, the marvel is how easily it can still be enjoyed by all ages.


http://www.hdnetmovies.com/bts/a-story-of-a-rabbit-the-making-of-who-framed-roger-rabbit/
No one has ever proven I am not God.
May 24th, 2017 at 1:53:06 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 328
Posts: 11352
Quote: rxwine
This is what I found:


Wow!

Thanks for posting it.

I suppose thought the technical side had been worked out, the second time is always easier, no way in hell Warner et al would let their characters be used in a sequel for so little money...

It's too bad. While there was much buzz about Donald and Daffy Duck being in the same scene ("This is the last time I work with someone with a speech impediment!"), and Bugs and Mickey giving Eddie a spare, they weren't really relevant to the plot (and by that time few remembered Betty Boop or many of the other classic characters). The new characters, Roger, Jessica, Jake Lloyd's judge, the car, the weasels, etc., would have been able to carry a sequel.

Besides the look of the film, and having an engaging story, what made it, I think, was the full mixture of cartoons and people. Things like anvils, giant horseshoe magnets, the portable hole (from Roadrunner fame), etc. being used in the real world the same way as they work in animation. That was brilliant.

As to the tone, for the era it was more or less set in, I thought it fit in well as a light noir film.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
May 24th, 2017 at 2:36:58 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 110
Posts: 11604
Quote: Nareed
I don't recall where I heard this joke: A sequel of "Gone with the Wind" would start with Rhett telling Scarlet, "You know, my dear, perhaps I do give a damn after all."


Vivien Leigh was so beautiful in person, for
a short period in her life, she was said to
take many peoples breath away. They
were speechless when meeting her for
the first time. Same with Liz Taylor with
her violet eyes, when she was early 20's.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
May 24th, 2017 at 8:04:44 PM permalink
pew
Member since: Jan 8, 2013
Threads: 3
Posts: 818
District 9 should have had a sequel. I thought it was made for one. Wrath of khan...wait, never mind.
May 24th, 2017 at 8:28:11 PM permalink
Ayecarumba
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 85
Posts: 1410
Quote: pew
District 9 should have had a sequel. I thought it was made for one. Wrath of khan...wait, never mind.
Chappie? Elysium?

Enter The Dragon could have been the start of a 007 like series. Bruce Lee's untimely passing spawned a slew of cheap knock offs but not a sequel.
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