Bomb Proof Movies

Page 1 of 212>
July 19th, 2017 at 12:39:16 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 706
Posts: 8142
Bombs seem to come and go in movies. But it seems as if after a particularly bad year, the studios are pretty careful.

The year 2017 Seems to have only two really disastrous movies. A lot better than the 11 from last year. Movies like "The Mummy" which had dissappointing domestic ticket sales are not listed as bombs because foreign sales were 4X as large.

2017 Estimated Losses
$150,000,000 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword 
$60,000,000 Ghost in the Shell 

2016 Estimated Losses
$115,000,000 Monster Trucks
$75,000,000121,700,000 Ben-Hur
$77,000,000100,000,000 The BFG
$80,000,00090,000,000 Gods of Egypt
$75,000,00090,000,000 Allied
$75,000,000 The Finest Hours
$75,000,000 Ghostbusters
$75,000,000 The Huntsman: Winter's War
$75,000,000 Live by Night
$75,000,000 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
$70,000,000+ Alice Through the Looking Glass
$60,000,000 Deepwater Horizon

Scarlett Johansson, is by some measure the biggest female actor in the world based on her Marvel appearances, but in her big budget films on her own, she is now 1 for three (Lucy, Ghost in the Shell, and The Island)
July 19th, 2017 at 6:21:26 AM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 719
Quote: Pacomartin
Bombs seem to come and go in movies. But it seems as if after a particularly bad year, the studios are pretty careful.

The year 2017 Seems to have only two really disastrous movies. A lot better than the 11 from last year. Movies like "The Mummy" which had dissappointing domestic ticket sales are not listed as bombs because foreign sales were 4X as large.

2017 Estimated Losses
$150,000,000 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword 
$60,000,000 Ghost in the Shell 

2016 Estimated Losses
$115,000,000 Monster Trucks
$75,000,000121,700,000 Ben-Hur
$77,000,000100,000,000 The BFG
$80,000,00090,000,000 Gods of Egypt
$75,000,00090,000,000 Allied
$75,000,000 The Finest Hours
$75,000,000 Ghostbusters
$75,000,000 The Huntsman: Winter's War
$75,000,000 Live by Night
$75,000,000 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
$70,000,000+ Alice Through the Looking Glass
$60,000,000 Deepwater Horizon

Scarlett Johansson, is by some measure the biggest female actor in the world based on her Marvel appearances, but in her big budget films on her own, she is now 1 for three (Lucy, Ghost in the Shell, and The Island)


I may have to take responsibility for this as I have not seen any of those movies.
July 19th, 2017 at 7:12:07 AM permalink
terapined
Member since: Aug 6, 2014
Threads: 35
Posts: 3007
Quote: DRich
I may have to take responsibility for this as I have not seen any of those movies.

I only saw one, Live By Night, and i bought a stream rather then see it in a theatre.
I was excited to see it since I read the book
I was super disapointed in the movie. Some of the best scenes in the book were never filmed. Uggh
Sometimes we live no particular way but our own - Grateful Dead "Eyes of the World"
July 19th, 2017 at 9:10:30 AM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4578
Quote: Pacomartin
Scarlett Johansson, is by some measure the biggest female actor in the world based on her Marvel appearances, but in her big budget films on her own, she is now 1 for three (Lucy, Ghost in the Shell, and The Island)
So how much of the poor market performance is due to the female star? Script? Director? F/X?

Do movie goers know the start in advance?

Casablanca bombed until it became known as a 'cult film'. Other movies share similar marketing marvels. Robert Redford played Brubaker but actual news coverage of a prison graveyard being uncovered sparked attendance. China Syndrome made money but how much of it was due to Three Mile Island taking place the week after it opened?
July 19th, 2017 at 9:46:28 AM permalink
Mosca
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 17
Posts: 394
Allied was okay enough, Deepwater Horizon was pretty decent, Ghostbusters wasn't really all that funny. I didn't see any of the rest.
July 19th, 2017 at 11:12:55 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 706
Posts: 8142
Quote: Fleastiff
Casablanca bombed until it became known as a 'cult film'. Other movies share similar marketing marvels. Robert Redford played Brubaker but actual news coverage of a prison graveyard being uncovered sparked attendance. China Syndrome made money but how much of it was due to Three Mile Island taking place the week after it opened?


I think a lot of movies got a break because of world events. But most movies prior to 1980 that were considered bombs were decent films that had sky high budgets, like Cleopatra, or Hello Dolly.

The Fall of the Roman Empire in 1964 is a movie that could never sell enough tickets to match it's $19 million budget, but is generally thought of as a good movie.


But the big budget film that nobody likes or attends is more of a product of the 1980s after Jaws and Exorcist and Star Wars convinces studios that they needed blockbuster hits to fill the summer.

It took a little while until someone figured out how to spend $100 million producing a movie that was by most measures, completely unwatchable even if it was free.


Or more contemporary a movie with a budget of well over $100 million that sold less than 4 million domestic tickets and had low appeal internationally.
July 19th, 2017 at 4:11:05 PM permalink
ams288
Member since: Apr 21, 2016
Threads: 11
Posts: 2098
Didn't Monster Trucks come out in 2017?
In order to insult me, I must first value your opinion
July 20th, 2017 at 12:56:59 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 706
Posts: 8142
Quote: ams288
Didn't Monster Trucks come out in 2017?


It's considered a 2016 movie because it was released in other countries in December.
December 21, 2016 (France)
January 13, 2017 (United States)

This cycle of years with dozens of expensive bombs seems to come and go. I am not talking about ART-HOUSE films which by their very nature take risks. I am talking about films with big budgets that attract almost no audience.
July 20th, 2017 at 7:44:54 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4578
Quote: Pacomartin
I am talking about films with big budgets that attract almost no audience.
Poor advertising?? What about Legend of the Sword instead of King Arthur Legend of the Sword. Seems to me that was an obvious blunder. Surely there must be some fan magazine studies on 'bombs'. Though in the UK to 'do a bomb' means to have a great success whereas in the US something such as closing on opening night is to 'bomb'.
July 21st, 2017 at 4:14:50 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 706
Posts: 8142
Quote: Fleastiff
Poor advertising?? What about Legend of the Sword instead of King Arthur Legend of the Sword. Seems to me that was an obvious blunder.


The last "King Arthur" movie made by Disney in 2004 starring art house picture actor Clive Owen did poorly as well, although Disney's marketing muscle meant that more revenue was earned overseas. Combined with the smaller budget the 2004 picture was more of a flop than an absolute bomb.

Opening weekend
$15,193,907 King Arthur 7/7/2004 Production Budget: $120 million
$15,371,270 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword 5/12/2017 Production Budget: $175 million

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/box-office-king-arthur-could-lose-150m-falling-sword-1003638
Page 1 of 212>