aviation pilot union scope clause

October 29th, 2017 at 10:55:42 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 744
Posts: 8737
The scope clause is part of a contract between an airline and a pilot union. This clause is used by the union of a major airline to limit the number and/or size of aircraft that airline may contract out to a Regional airline. The goal is to protect union jobs at the major airline from being outsourced to regional airlines operating larger aircraft.

Until 2020 , the limit was is set at 76 seats and a 86,000 lb maximum takeoff weight 2020 at Delta Air Lines.
Presumably Delta is going to try and renegotiate the clause to 110 seats and MTOW of 134,000 lbs to cover the Bombardier CS100

If Delta purchasing hundreds of these planes, and sells them to their regional airlines if they get the scope clause renegotiated we could see a radical change in the domestic aviation landscape.

For instance, Delta moves about 3000 passengers a day in each direction to their seven hubs on roughly 20 daily round trips. Like all the other major airlines they primarily contract out to a regional airline to fly people to LAX, using a larger plane less than one times per day.

Delta destination from San Diego - miles
Los Angeles, CA 109
Salt Lake City, UT 626
Seattle, WA 1050 ~ Boeing 717 with 110 seats
Minneapolis, MN 1532
Atlanta, GA 1892
Detroit, MI 1956
New York, NY 2446

Right now Delta uses a fairly diverse mix of aircraft for their operation at San Diego
Seats
110 Boeing 717-200
160 Boeing 737-800
180 Boeing 737-900ER
187 Boeing 757-200
234 Boeing 757-300
213 Boeing 767-300/300ER
246 Boeing 767-400/ER
159 McDonnell Douglas MD-90
132 Airbus Industrie A319
157 Airbus Industrie A320-100/200

Theoretically the whole operation at San Diego airport could be contracted out to a regional airline using roughly 32 Bombardier CS100 planes per day
October 29th, 2017 at 11:49:48 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 50
Posts: 4984
It used to be that Regionals were stepping stones to the Majors, but no longer. And the Majors are perfectly willing to contract EVERYTHING out and be a corporate pawn of Wall Street investors if they could do so.

In this situation, it appears that the clause will in fact be re-negotiated.
October 30th, 2017 at 3:23:57 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 103
Posts: 6964
Quote: Fleastiff
It used to be that Regionals were stepping stones to the Majors, but no longer. And the Majors are perfectly willing to contract EVERYTHING out and be a corporate pawn of Wall Street investors if they could do so.


Corporate pawn of Wall Street?

I would think the more they contract out, the better. It should be better to have a regional running the route and focusing on it as their main business than for a major to see it as an annoyance, just something to get the cattle to the big airport. Ask someone who had to use BUF/ROC to get to NYC area pre-JBLU.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
October 30th, 2017 at 3:38:27 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 744
Posts: 8737
Quote: Fleastiff
In this situation, it appears that the clause will in fact be re-negotiated.

You may be correct.

The 76-seat scope limit originated from a Northwest Airlines configuration, which traditionally included a large business class section. The Northwest legacy remains with all airlines adopting the same 76 seat configuration.



Continental filed for bankruptcy protection in 1983 and 1990, America West in 1991, US Airways in 2002 and 2004, United in 2002, Delta and Northwest on the same day in 2005, and American in 2011.