Forget the Eclipse

Page 1 of 212>
January 18th, 2018 at 4:14:25 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 89
Posts: 2205
Actually don't forget the eclipse, but predicted before the next US eclipse is a really, really big deal ~ I can't believe how little attention it is getting. I don't think you have to have a huge interest in astronomy to agree.

Quote: link
two stars will merge into a luminous red nova in about five years. At its brightest, the spectacular explosion produced by this nova could reach an apparent magnitude of about 2.0, akin to a bright star in the night sky, making it visible even from most urban areas... during the year 2022, plus or minus seven months


OK, not a supernova, but this is astounding, historical. Won't need a telescope.

Regarding supernovas, if I am reading the wikipedia article right, the last one visible to the naked eye was seen in 1604, so those alive will be lucky to witness such an event, I hope to be one of them. And let's hope the astronomers are good at predicting this. I was alerted by a recent episode of "How the Universe Works" where it was mentioned the usual astronomical predictions are for things happening way in the future of course. This is unique.

That article and the wikipedia article on red novas , "Luminous red nova", does not mention whether any red novas have been seen by the naked eye before.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/01/astronomers-predict-a-red-nova-will-brighten-our-skies-in-2022/
Mustard:You like Kipling, Miss Scarlet? Sure, I'll eat anything [from movie]
January 18th, 2018 at 6:16:40 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 106
Posts: 7865
Quote: odiousgambit

Regarding supernovas, if I am reading the wikipedia article right, the last one visible to the naked eye was seen in 1604, so those alive will be lucky to witness such an event, I hope to be one of them. And let's hope the astronomers are good at predicting this. I was alerted by a recent episode of "How the Universe Works" where it was mentioned the usual astronomical predictions are for things happening way in the future of course. This is unique.


Hopefully better than last year's eclipse. Outside with a welding helmet it was just so underwhelming. Inside it was as if it was just cloudy. I think I will hold out for when the Milky Way collides with Andromeda. That will be wroth cracking a beer and watching.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
January 18th, 2018 at 9:06:34 AM permalink
Dalex64
Member since: Mar 8, 2014
Threads: 2
Posts: 2356
For comparison, Polaris, the north star, has an apparent magnitude of 2.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." Daniel Patrick Moynihan
January 18th, 2018 at 9:18:23 AM permalink
beachbumbabs
Member since: Sep 3, 2013
Threads: 5
Posts: 1432
You're not going to convince OG or me of that, AZD. We were among the group who met in NC in the path of totality. It was awesome! We saw the Phantom snakes on the ground, the double shadows in the leaves, the diamond ring, and about 2min of total eclipse with the aurora blazing.

So, reference the supernova, OG. It already happened, right? It's just that the light and energy from the event is still on its way to us.

What if the supernova precipitated an intelligent life exodus, and they're on their way here as well?

Correction : red nova, not supernova.
Never doubt a small group of concerned citizens can change the world; it's the only thing ever has
January 18th, 2018 at 9:34:40 AM permalink
Ayecarumba
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 85
Posts: 1514
Quote: AZDuffman
Hopefully better than last year's eclipse. Outside with a welding helmet it was just so underwhelming. Inside it was as if it was just cloudy. I think I will hold out for when the Milky Way collides with Andromeda. That will be wroth cracking a beer and watching.


As BBB attests, there's a huge difference between totality and 99%. The light from the sun is so powerful that even with a sliver of the disc uncovered, the ambient light looks like a cloudy day. Totality is a completely different experience. Make plans to go to Texas, you won't regret it.
January 18th, 2018 at 9:50:42 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 106
Posts: 7865
Quote: Ayecarumba
As BBB attests, there's a huge difference between totality and 99%. The light from the sun is so powerful that even with a sliver of the disc uncovered, the ambient light looks like a cloudy day. Totality is a completely different experience. Make plans to go to Texas, you won't regret it.


If I go it will rain and ruin it for everyone.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
January 18th, 2018 at 10:25:02 AM permalink
Dalex64
Member since: Mar 8, 2014
Threads: 2
Posts: 2356
Quote: beachbumbabs
So, reference the supernova, OG. It already happened, right? It's just that the light and energy from the event is still on its way to us.

1800 years ago, according to the article.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." Daniel Patrick Moynihan
January 18th, 2018 at 10:50:57 AM permalink
JimRockford
Member since: Sep 18, 2015
Threads: 2
Posts: 361
Quote: Ayecarumba
As BBB attests, there's a huge difference between totality and 99%. The light from the sun is so powerful that even with a sliver of the disc uncovered, the ambient light looks like a cloudy day. Totality is a completely different experience. Make plans to go to Texas, you won't regret it.


If I live just inside the southern boundary shown below, would it be worth the effort to watch from a spot closer to the center of the path?
January 18th, 2018 at 10:56:39 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12529
Quote: JimRockford
If I live just inside the southern boundary shown below, would it be worth the effort to watch from a spot closer to the center of the path?


Check if you get more time in totality closer to the centerline.

But also keep weather in mind. A shorter totality under clear or mostly clear skies, beats longer totality under clouds. Of course that's impossible to predict exactly. the 91 eclipse took place in the middle of the rainy season in Mex City, when overcast skies are pervasive. Just the same, at the time of totality there were enough breaks in the clouds to see a great deal.

People who see a total eclipse and are not impressed must be dead inside.
Fresh out of clues. Did you really expect anything?
January 18th, 2018 at 10:45:00 PM permalink
Ayecarumba
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 85
Posts: 1514
Quote: JimRockford
If I live just inside the southern boundary shown below, would it be worth the effort to watch from a spot closer to the center of the path?


The short answer is "yes". The closer you are to the centerline the longer you will be in totality. The shadow is circular, so the longest line through it will be as close to the diameter as possible. The landscape will play into your viewing decision, as you should try to be in as flat an area as possible (which I understand is not a problem in Texas); barring that, get as high up as you can, as I understand it is possible to see the shadow racing toward you if you are in an elevated location. Nareed's suggestions are sound regarding the weather, and apparently we will all need to be as far from AZD as possible to avoid thunderstorms (hehe.. Schleprock)

As for the red nova, this is the first I have heard of this.. maybe it will get more advertising as the event draws nearer.

There was a story and dashcam video in the news just the other night of a meteor that burned bright green then white, and struck the ground with enough force to register as a magnitude 2 earthquake in Michigan?? Is it that there are a lot more things falling on the Earth lately, or is the incidence the same as always, but there are more cameras rolling now which makes for interesting television stories?
Page 1 of 212>