PA congressional districts

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February 13th, 2018 at 9:52:15 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10146
Quote: beachbumbabs
You make my point for me. Those representatives don't represent the people of that state in parity.


I wonder how the states stack up in parity between the congressional election compared to the Presidential election of 2016

For instance
Democrats control 5 of 18 districts or 27.78% vs 46.5% voted for Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania.
Republicans control 14 of 53 districts or 26.42% vs 31.6% voted for Donald Trump in California.
February 13th, 2018 at 10:00:48 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12535
How about doing away with first past the post elections?
Donald Trump is a fucking liar
February 13th, 2018 at 10:39:13 AM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 121
Posts: 15573
Quote: AZDuffman
I would not say they "go to waste." They count same as any other. But they do guarantee you get crazies like Maxine Waters or that goofball who said Guam might "tip over."


I loved that guy, a Congressman who thought
islands floated in the ocean and could tip over
if more weight was one side than on the other.
Obama thought there were 57 states, they're
probably best friends..
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
February 13th, 2018 at 10:45:19 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10146
There are 12 congressional districts that voted for Democratic congressman, and for Trump for President
There are 23 congressional districts that voted for Republican congressman, and for Hillary for President

Only CO and VA voted for Hillary and also a Republican congressional delegate. Maine was split, but the state at large went to Hillary
Colorado 4 Republicans, 3 Democrats
Virginia 7 Republicans, 4 Democrats
Maine 1 Republican, 1 Democrat

I have never run a parity check between a state's congressional representation and their vote for POTUS by percentage. I suspect PA may be the most skewed.

Quote: Nareed
How about doing away with first past the post elections?


You will have to expand on that comment.
February 13th, 2018 at 11:02:25 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 110
Posts: 8633
Quote: Pacomartin


I have never run a parity check between a state's congressional representation and their vote for POTUS by percentage. I suspect PA may be the most skewed.


PA is two states, Pittsburgh/Philly and all the rest. Philly is the real culprit for the skew.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
February 13th, 2018 at 11:05:23 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 110
Posts: 8633
Quote: Evenbob
I loved that guy, a Congressman who thought
islands floated in the ocean and could tip over
if more weight was one side than on the other.
Obama thought there were 57 states, they're
probably best friends..


I still hand to the General he was questioning. Any regular man would have lost it, called him a moron, or just got up and left. But this guy just answers and moves on. Reminds me of my time in call center hell and some dopey girl said she needed the loan to pay her attorney to file her bankruptcy paperwork.

Where do these people come from?
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
February 13th, 2018 at 11:44:43 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10146
The word gerrymander was used for the first time in the Boston Gazette on 26 March 1812. The word was created in reaction to a redrawing of Massachusetts state senate election districts under Governor Elbridge Gerry. In 1812, Governor Gerry signed a bill that redistricted Massachusetts to benefit his Democratic-Republican Party. When mapped, one of the contorted districts in the Boston area was said to resemble the shape of a mythological salamander.

Quote: AZDuffman
PA is two states, Pittsburgh/Philly and all the rest. Philly is the real culprit for the skew.

In some ways Massachusetts is the most extreme state. One million voters (33%) of the state voted for Trump, but all 9 congressmen are Democrats.

I assume both parties draw boundaries to their own advantage.


A total 19 states have every representative in one party (including all 7 "at-large" states). All of these state naturally have their representatives from the same party as their Presidential candidate (7 Democratic and 12 Republican) . Massachusetts has the most number of congressmen for a state with this characteristic.

State 2016 POTUS Representatives Congressmen
Alaska Republican Republican 1
Delaware Democratic Democratic 1
Montana Republican Republican 1
North Dakota Republican Republican 1
South Dakota Republican Republican 1
Vermont Democratic Democratic 1
Wyoming Republican Republican 1
Hawaii Democratic Democratic 2
Idaho Republican Republican 2
New Hampshire Democratic Democratic 2
Rhode Island Democratic Democratic 2
Nebraska Republican Republican 3
West Virginia Republican Republican 3
Arkansas Republican Republican 4
Kansas Republican Republican 4
Utah Republican Republican 4
Connecticut Democratic Democratic 5
Oklahoma Republican Republican 5
Massachusetts Democratic Democratic 9
February 13th, 2018 at 12:37:57 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12535
Quote: Pacomartin
You will have to expand on that comment.


Sure. First past the post elections are those where the candidate with a majority of the vote, or sometimes with the most votes even if short of a majority, wins the race. For example, US Congressional elections.
Donald Trump is a fucking liar
February 13th, 2018 at 1:17:20 PM permalink
ams288
Member since: Apr 21, 2016
Threads: 15
Posts: 3271
Quote: AZDuffman
So are things like cumulative voting. But that was allowed in many places. All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others. Regionally is the fairest way to do it, to insure people are as close to their Rep as possible. If Democrats were not so far out of the mainstream, they would compete better in less urban areas.


If Republicans were not so far out of the mainstream, they could win elections by not rigging them in their favor.
In order to insult me, I must first value your opinion
February 13th, 2018 at 4:14:22 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 850
Posts: 10146
Quote: ams288
If Republicans were not so far out of the mainstream, they could win elections by not rigging them in their favor.




Ohio is similar to Pennsylvania as Democrats are stacked into four districts (#11) Cleveland, (#3) Colombus, (#9) Toledo, and (#13) Youngstown. All the other districts have Republican congressmen.

But presumably both parties take advantage of being allowed to draw district boundaries. As I said earlier 1/3 of voters chose Trump in Massachusetts, but all 9 districts have Democratic congressmen.

There is only a single Republican congressman in Maryland,Oregon,Nevada, and New Mexico. I doubt that is representative of t he percentage of voters who voted Republican in recent elections.
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