Pay as you weigh flying

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5 members have voted

November 15th, 2013 at 7:57:01 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 50
Posts: 4804
Air Taxis and Taxi sharing are the only booming parts of the aviation business.
January 30th, 2014 at 12:28:14 AM permalink
beachbumbabs
Member since: Sep 3, 2013
Threads: 5
Posts: 673
Air taxis are any aircraft making a commercial run under USC FAR Part 135. Can be charter, scheduled, cargo, medivac, etc. Any aircraft flying pax/cargo for hire where the airframe is not rated for more than 60 passengers (no matter if it's all cargo with no seats) is air taxi, including helicopters. 61+ is air carrier, under Part 61. Pilots and airplanes must have advanced licenses/equipment to fly for hire, and follow much more stringent requlations.

Hawaiian island-hoppers have been weighing their passengers for at least the last 5 years (probably much longer). Critical for most twin-engine and single-engine props; guessing not allowed. Way too many wrecked aircraft still underwater and in the saddles of terrain for that. Water is so clear around the islands you can see some of the wrecks; very difficult to raise/recover them.
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die. -ersatz Buddha
January 31st, 2014 at 4:35:05 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 50
Posts: 4804
These fractional large jets that movie stars often have are doing well as the wealthy grow tired of being frisked and lengthy lines.

Also small jets seem to be booming including firms that free float their inventory and sell last minute ride shares.
January 31st, 2014 at 7:43:32 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 735
Posts: 8571
Quote: beachbumbabs
Hawaiian island-hoppers have been weighing their passengers for at least the last 5 years (probably much longer). Critical for most twin-engine and single-engine props; guessing not allowed. Way too many wrecked aircraft still underwater and in the saddles of terrain for that. Water is so clear around the islands you can see some of the wrecks; very difficult to raise/recover them.


I used to fly around the Caribbean for work, and we were regularly weighed. They would make decisions on who sat where on the plane, and presumably if forced they would leave someone behind.

But the fare did not vary according to weight.
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