Racin' With Face

December 30th, 2013 at 4:21:00 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4315
Many a stirrup ring bore fire marks from being used as a re-branding iron.
January 1st, 2014 at 2:16:16 PM permalink
Face
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Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Fleastiff
Many a stirrup ring bore fire marks from being used as a re-branding iron.


Please explain. Been trying to decipher it myself, can't, and it's driving me nuts =p
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
January 1st, 2014 at 6:17:35 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4315
Quote: Face
Please explain. Been trying to decipher it myself, can't, and it's driving me nuts =p


You apparently have a problem where a few parts have numbers that have to be "adjusted" for some weird reason I didn't bother to even try to follow. My suggestion is to "adjust" the serial number until it is correct.

A branding iron used to burn a brand into cattle was hard metal heated to a high temperature.
An ordinary stirrup ring is a softer metal that shows a characteristic bluing when heated in a fire and artfully used to "adjust" a steer's existing brand into a new brand.

Old Western Joke:
A cowboy who was about to be tried on cattle rustling charges declined to examine the prospective jurors but asked leave of the court to examine their horses. When he saw that ten out of the twelve jurors were using saddles where one of the rings showed evidence of having been used as a re-branding iron, he pronounced the jurors were acceptable to him.

The jurors are supposed to have voted him Not Guilty so he would not expose them.

In other words, my response was to suggest to you that you solve your problem by altering a few numbers on the parts in question.
January 1st, 2014 at 7:22:45 PM permalink
Face
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Quote: Fleastiff
You apparently have a problem where a few parts have numbers that have to be "adjusted" for some weird reason I didn't bother to even try to follow.


Don't bother. It's completely stupid.

Quote: FleaStiff
In other words, my response was to suggest to you that you solve your problem by altering a few numbers on the parts in question.


Gotcha. And believe me, that though has crossed (and stayed into) my mind. The good thing is the "D15B" I have, which also says D15B on the engine block, actually did come in my make, model, and generation of car. It's the pesky VTEC version that I have that does not. And that involves not only smaller numbers located on the head, but also easily noticeable and identifiable equipment that shouldn't be there, if I were using the legal version. The only way I could get that past the scrutineers is to coat it in invisible paint, and I happen to be fresh out =(

I dunno. I'm going to visit the track headquarters and attempt to get a meeting with the Director of Competition. Anyone with a modicum of objectivity and common sense can see I'm using an engine that is nearly identical in every single property to that of one which is legal, it just has the "wrong numbers" on it. And between the fact that it is actually slightly worse in performance as well as their weight penalty rules which make everything equal anyways, I hope he will show mercy and just let me run it.

Either way, I've come too far and this dream is too important to stop. If I have to scrap the whole thing and start anew, that's exactly what I'm going to do.
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
February 25th, 2014 at 9:26:58 AM permalink
Face
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Great, great, GREAT news!

After much sweating, driving, and a little bit of crying, I got my engine to be deemed legal and I'm back in business!!

Basically, the Competition Director admitted said changes were reactionary and were implemented to neuter a certain dominant car. In addition to the "generation" rule, they also added weight penalty rules to give them leeway in addressing over dominance. As such, the weight rule allowed them to open the doors to many more different engine/body combinations, thereby allowing more people to race.

In other words, I should expect a massive weight penalty to counteract the sublime engine/body combo I've put together, but I can at least get on the track.

And that's all I ever wanted =D
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
February 25th, 2014 at 12:09:51 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 115
Posts: 4736
I guess there could be an advantage to adding weight, as you can put it where you want it.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
February 26th, 2014 at 5:58:38 AM permalink
Face
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Quote: rxwine
I guess there could be an advantage to adding weight, as you can put it where you want it.


If only that were the case. You can't have any more than a 51/49 balance differential in any corner. If I could load it all in as just cross weight?! Hoo boy, I'd be rippin' around on rails ;)

Minimum weight has been raised to 2,100lbs. Add 700lbs if you run a DOHC. Mine is SOHC, but gets the power of a DOHC so I imagine I'm going to have, at the very least, that 700lb penalty.

My car was already only 2,048lbs off the showroom floor. The glass alone was probably 70lbs - gone. Both seats removed for an aluminum frame racing seat, that's probably close to another 70lbs. All the interior panels, floor carpeting, miles of wiring, light assemblies, contour strips,... all gone. Bracing in the bumpers cut out and scrapped, power steering pump gone, wipers gone, power steering fluid and wiper fluid reservoirs gone, heating core and ducting gone, dash gutted. Stock clutch replaced with a lightweight Stage 2 racing clutch, 1,600cc engine replaced with a 1,500cc powerplant.... even adding 150lbs of cage and my 210lb large body, I bet I'm still coming in at under a ton.

I bet adding a whole 800lbs isn't out of the question. But at least if I do, and even if I can't use it as cross weight, I can at least have it as inboard and as low as possible.

Plus, c'mon... I'm totally gonna sandbag!! ;) If I have a dominant car but only the wins get scrutinized, hell... a year full of Top 5's will still put one in championship contention =D
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
March 15th, 2014 at 1:02:35 PM permalink
Face
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Life has been stressful, so I decided to put some time in the garage today.

I'm not much for asking for help, nor for waiting for help to arrive, so I set about trying to pull the engine myself. Most of the plumbing and cables were removed except for two which I didn't know how or what they did. Other than that, it was simply unbolting the mounts and pulling it out.

The one line wound up being a fuel line, which I got off easily. The other was a cable and I had no idea what it was for. I ended up texting a guy from the Honda Tech forums that clued me into it being the speedometer cable and gave instructions on how to remove it. His instructions didn't quite work since my piece is a rusted mess, so I just grabbed it with pliers and ripped it out. What do I need a speedo for, anyways? =p

That done, I assembled the hoist and started to pull it out. It went relatively well, only one mount bolt gave me problems. The only "mistake" I made was not fully removing the shift linkage from the tranny, instead separating the linkage at the shifter. It got sort of bound up as the engine lifted, and since I was using pneumatic force, I didn't feel the catch. I wound up bending it pretty good, but it's nothing I can't put in a vice and bend back to true.

The real near disaster is I didn't realize I was also lifting the entire car because of the binding. When it finally came unbound, the car dropped and just barely landed back on the floor jacks. And I mean BARELY.



That's about 4 millimeters from disaster. 4mm from dropping the entirety of its weight on my brand new control arms and tie rods, not to mention a right pain in the ass it would have been to lift the car back up again since it wouldn't have been possible to get a jack under it. Guess I got lucky.

About 90 minutes after I had started, I had the old engine out and on the floor. I began removing the tranny from the block, but ran out of motivation. Next time I have two hours free, it'll be time to remove the tranny, install the racing clutch, and bolt it all up to my new powerplant.

Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
March 19th, 2014 at 10:23:00 AM permalink
Face
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Busy, busy, BUSY.

Sunday I got the tranny off the motor, a job that was way easier than anticipated. I pulled the old clutch, noting its positioning so I didnít mess up the install, and got down to the flywheel. But it was then I noticed a problem Ė the flywheel on my new motor wasnít really a flywheel at all. I dunno what it was, but it had no teeth for the starter motor to engage upon, meaning I couldnít start it by key. While Iíve driven cars without starters before (some for up to 9 months at a time), the rules state your car must be able to start on its own. So I had to swap flywheels.

Well, as Wiz has bitched about before, the flywheel bolts werenít standard hex. They were 12pt bolts, which I only had in 3/8Ē drive. And my impact gun is 1/2Ē drive, so I didnít have the muscle to break Ďem free and the dayís project ended there.

Monday I returned armed with an adapter to use my 3/8 in my 1/2 gun, and they came off lickety split. I got the flywheel swapped with no problem whatsoever. Next came the clutch, and my worries began. I had drank too much beer (a necessity when working on cars) and couldnít remember how to orient the clutch plate in the basket. I eventually settled on putting it in the way the old one sat, hoping I remembered to set it down properly, and figured I had a 50% of doing it right. Within minutes, the clutch was installed.



The tranny came next. I was surprised how light the little D engine tranny was. Maybe 30lbs? It was nothing to hoist up by hand and set in. The hardest and most time consuming part was putting the engine back in the hoist to hold it, as I had no one there to help me. But by the time three hours had passed, I had all of the above completed and was looking at a solid power plant. That was as good a place as any to quit for the day.



Tuesday I took off from work and hopped back into the car to keep my mind busy and off personal drama. I called The Sheriff, but he was working. So, stubborn as ever, I set about trying to install the engine By Myself.

Iíll tell ya, I didnít and still donít think it was possible. You need to manipulate and maneuver the block as it settles into the bay; pulling mounts around wiring, lifting mounts into place, moving hoses out of the way as it drops. And the valve to lower the engine is some 4í away from the car, nowhere near enough to keep a hand on the engine if youíre working the hoist. But I had faith. Faith that was tested deeply.



40 some pumps to get the engine off the ground. A multiple step dance to wrangle it into place. Drop it in, and not in position. 20 pumps to lift it back up, a little more dancing, drop it in. Caught on hoses. 20 more pumps, even more dancing, drop it in. And thereís no way that mount is gonna clear.

For almost 3 straight hours, that was my life. Try a thousand step process just to find it wonít work. Lose my cool. Take a step back, have a smoke, crack a beer, and just sit on the floor until I cooled off and wasnít in danger of using the Problem Solver for ill. Then start the thousand step dance all over again. I lifted, I lowered, I maneuvered, I took parts off, put more on. I had the car jacked up, jacks holding parts of the engine, the hoist holding most of the engine, all sorts of bolts and mounts in every one of my pockets ready to jam home if a miracle happened and something lined up. And sometime after hour 4 had passed and hour five loomed on the horizon, I jammed home the last bolt and let everything go. The Engine Was In O.o



I couldnít and still canít believe it. I got it in completely on my own. And although I was exhausted (and somewhat into my cups), I rode that wave of accomplishment. I set about reinstalling my new axles, a job that went off without a hitch. That done, I installed my new brake rotors, a job that went off without a hitch. And since I came that far, I might as well rebuild the entire corner Ė control arms, tie rods, the lot of it. And two hours after that I pulled the jack out from under it for the first time in 4 months and let her sit on her own 4 wheels.



Itís a car again!



Every bit of the mechanical connections are fastened and complete. The wiring was mostly completed over winter, itís just a case of plugging everything in now. I need to reinstall the exhaust and radiator (an elementary job), put the front end back together (a child could do it), and then plumb the thing with fluid and fuel lines (my only worry). Once thatís done, I need only fill it with the proper fluids and, assuming I put that clutch in the right way, the BUILD IS DONE. Only paint, decals, and tires will remain.

Man, I have come a long way. 8 weeks until first practice. Also 8 weeks until the one year anniversary of this thread. ManÖ mindblowing.
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
March 20th, 2014 at 4:43:51 AM permalink
beachbumbabs
Member since: Sep 3, 2013
Threads: 5
Posts: 671
What an enormous job, Face. Very cool that you've taken this on. Now I'm gonna worry about that clutch until you tell us it's in the right way...lol.
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die. -ersatz Buddha