Spanish Word of the Day

May 14th, 2017 at 6:48:32 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Pacomartin
Trailer with English subtitles.


Since you asked, I still find the Spaniard accent to be incredibly annoying.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
June 5th, 2017 at 7:50:39 PM permalink
Wizard
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Fecha: 5 de Junio, 2017
Palabra: Descansillo


Today's SWD means landing, as in the landing of stairs.

The question for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast desconsillo y descansar. The latter obviously meaning to tire out. Is it that one is tired at after walking down a set of stairs? I could see being tired after walking up but not walking down. Or, is the descansillo at the top of the stairs in Spanish?

Ejemplo time

Tia Conejo cayó al descansillo = Aunt Bunny fell to the landing of the stairs.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
June 5th, 2017 at 8:18:17 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Wizard
Fecha: 5 de Junio, 2017
Palabra: Descansillo



It looks like descansillo and rellano are almost synonyms , but it sounds like descansillo is an intermediate landing, while rellano is the landing at the top of the stairs.

rellano
1. m. Porción horizontal en que termina cada tramo de escalera.
2. m. Llano que interrumpe la pendiente de un terreno.


descansillo
Del dim. de descanso.
1. m. Rellano en que terminan los tramos de una escalera.



Both the noun and the verb are ultimately derived from the verb "cansar" which is from a Latin word that means "to tire".


descansar Conjugar el verbo descansar
De des- y cansar.
1. intr. Cesar en el trabajo, reparar las fuerzas con la quietud.
2. intr. Tener algún alivio en las preocupaciones.
3. intr. Desahogarse, tener alivio o consuelo comunicando a un amigo o a una persona de confianza los males o penalidades.
4. intr. Reposar, dormir. El enfermo ha descansado dos horas.
5. intr. Dicho de una persona: Estar tranquila y sin cuidado por tener la confianza puesta en algo o alguien.
6. intr. Dicho de una cosa: Estar asentada o apoyada sobre otra. El brazo descansaba sobre la almohada. U. t. en sent. fig.
7. intr. Dicho de una tierra de labor: Estar sin cultivo uno o más años.
8. intr. reposar (‖ estar enterrado).
9. tr. Hacer que alguien o una parte de su cuerpo pierdan el cansancio.
10. tr. Apoyar una cosa sobre otra.
11. tr. p. us. Aliviar a alguien en el trabajo, ayudarle en él.
June 5th, 2017 at 8:45:30 PM permalink
Wizard
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Thanks. Is there even a word in English for the place in stairs where you make a turn, like your second image? The stairs in my house make a u-turn and we have a little table there as that u-turn area is way bigger than it needs to be. Makes it easier lugging furniture to the second floor, at least.

I find it curious that these terms for stairs are related to cansar. You don't see too many elevators in Mexico so I thought people would be used to going up and down stairs.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
June 6th, 2017 at 12:02:09 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Wizard
Thanks. Is there even a word in English for the place in stairs where you make a turn, like your second image? The stairs in my house make a u-turn and we have a little table there as that u-turn area is way bigger than it needs to be. Makes it easier lugging furniture to the second floor, at least.


Wikipedia uses the rather un-poetic terms "landing" or "intermediate landing" which can be "intermediate quarter landing" for 90 degree turns, or "intermediate half landing" for 180 degree turns like below.

Wide comfortable stairs with large landings and nice views are meant to encourage people to skip the elevator.

Stairs that make a gradual turn are called "winders"


Quote: Wizard
I find it curious that these terms for stairs are related to cansar. You don't see too many elevators in Mexico so I thought people would be used to going up and down stairs.


It's more of an ancient derivation unrelated to modern thinking.

The root word is the Latin "campso" which is a borrowing from Ancient Greek κάμψαι (kámpsai), related to κάμπτω (kámptō, “I bend, turn”).
campsō (present infinitive campsāre, perfect active campsāvī, supine campsātum); first conjugation

Example: I turn or sail around a place; I redouble my steps

Descendants
Spanish: cansar
Portuguese: cansar
Italian: cansare
Catalan: cansar
Galician: cansar
Occitan: cansar
June 8th, 2017 at 7:45:11 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Pacomartin
rellano


"That's a word I haven't heard in a long time." Obi-wan Kenobi.

The word most commonly used for the landing is "descanso."

Yes, it also means, rest.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
June 8th, 2017 at 11:00:33 AM permalink
Wizard
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Fecha: 8 de Junio, 2017
Palabra: Furgoneta

Today's SWD means van, station wagon, or pick-up truck. I assume the eta suffix implies a small one. Personally, I think there should be three separate words for each type of vehicle, especially for a language that has so many words for throw. For example, if you went to a large dealership for cars and the salesman asked what kind of vehicle you wanted to see, and you said furgonetas that wouldn't narrow it down very much.

On a related subject, my former Spanish teacher said it made the hair on the back of her neck stand up when Mexicans used the word troque (sp?) for truck.

The question for the advanced readers is at what vehicle weight or size a furgón becomes a furgoneta?

Ejemplo time.

¿Puedo alquilar tu furgoneta para mover algunos cosas pesas? = May I borrow your pick-up truck to move some heavy items?
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
June 8th, 2017 at 12:23:01 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Wizard

The question for the advanced readers is at what vehicle weight or size a furgón becomes a furgoneta?


I just means light commercial vehicle. I think it is casual, just like people sometimes call a Ford Ranger a pickup truck instead of a light pick up truck.
A furgón could also mean a train car.

Chevy® Suburban is a brand which is, I believe, 9 passengers, but I have heard any large size passenger van called a suburban, regardless of the manufacturer or the number of seats.
June 8th, 2017 at 3:31:16 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
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Is there a Spanish phrase for Truck Farming?
June 8th, 2017 at 3:57:46 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 330
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Quote: Wizard
Today's SWD means van, station wagon, or pick-up truck.


That's another word that indicates your dictionary thinks whatever the hell they speak in Spain is Spanish :)

Quote:
On a related subject, my former Spanish teacher said it made the hair on the back of her neck stand up when Mexicans used the word troque (sp?) for truck.


Troca.

That's a regional usage, somewhat popular up north. They also favor "aparcar" instead of "estacionar."


{q]¿Puedo alquilar tu furgoneta para mover algunos cosas pesas? = May I borrow your pick-up truck to move some heavy items?


Close. It says "May I borrow your pick-up truck to move some weights items?"

It should say: "...cosas pesaDAS"
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.