Spanish Word of the Day

November 11th, 2012 at 8:07:27 AM permalink
Wizard
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Member since: Oct 23, 2012
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Quote: Nareed
it should be "arrasAs" and "todo EL tiempo."


I thought I would take a chance and use the subjunctive, since it was vague what events the Skipper was referring to. I also know Paco likes the subjunctive, and was hoping to impress him if I got it right. Dang.

Quote: Pacomartin
A blogger tells one story about how he studies Spanish. A Peruvian friend of his posted some Spanish on his Facebook, ""Happy no more. Things are looking color de hormiga"" Faced with this idiom he does two things.


Recently I purchased the book 2001 Spanish and English Idioms. I think the number of times it has contained an idiom I was looking for, like the one in question about the color ants, is zero. While it contains lots of expressions most of them are obvious, like "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush."

Also, is this expression referring to black or red ants anyway?

Quote:
It is common to say that something "se está poniendo color de hormiga."


I think you caught whatever Nareed had about a year ago with your accents. Maybe they look fine to you but they look like they are having convulsions to me. I still say whoever creates a keyboard with the Spanish accented letters, the ñ, and the @ will make a fortune.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 11th, 2012 at 8:20:42 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 313
Posts: 10670
Quote: Wizard
I still say whoever creates a keyboard with the Spanish accented letters, the ñ, and the @ will make a fortune.


Did you not see the keyboard on my laptop last May? All keyboards sold in México have those characters, and the Ñ as well :P

If you want to, I can bring you one on my next trip to Vegas.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
November 11th, 2012 at 8:21:04 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 692
Posts: 7963
Quote: Nareed
Actually it means to level or to raze.


The English word raze is a good translation, since it is an English cognate of arrasar. But we seldom use "raze" in casual conversation.

Wiktionary suggests that English devastate is a better translation for "arrasar" than "destroy". However, keep in mind that the word devastar also exists in Spanish.
November 11th, 2012 at 8:47:56 AM permalink
Wizard
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Quote: Nareed
Did you not see the keyboard on my laptop last May? All keyboards sold in México have those characters, and the Ñ as well :P

If you want to, I can bring you one on my next trip to Vegas.


I don't recall looking for the @ symbol on it. Whenever I go to an Internet cafe in a Spanish speaking country I have to ask somebody how to make an @.

I'm going to Cabo in December and will look for one there. If I'm unsuccessful then please do bring one in May.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 11th, 2012 at 9:29:01 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 313
Posts: 10670
Quote: Wizard
Whenever I go to an Internet cafe in a Spanish speaking country I have to ask somebody how to make an @.


Use the alt-gr key (located where the right-hand side alt key should be) together with either Q or 2.

Quote:
I'm going to Cabo in December and will look for one there. If I'm unsuccessful then please do bring one in May.


Try either an Office Depot, Office Max, Sam's Club, Costco or Walmart
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
November 11th, 2012 at 9:45:08 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 692
Posts: 7963
Spanish keyboards $30 plugs into your USB port.

I'll switch browsers to see if my problem with alternative letters clears up.

I did this paragraph with Google Chrome instead of Mozilla
De los sos oios tan fuertemientre llorando,
Tornava la cabeça e estavalos catando;
Vio puertas abiertas e uços sin cañados,
alcandaras vazias, sin pielles e sin mantos,
e sin falcones e sin adtores mudados.


I do like the subjunctive mood, it makes sentences sound cooler.
The Wizard decrees that all his subjects be counted and then beheaded. (subjunctive mood)
The Wizard wants his subjects to be counted and then beheaded. (indicative mood)

O, that I were a glove upon that hand,(subjunctive mood)
O, I want to be a glove upon that hand,(indicative mood)
November 11th, 2012 at 11:46:30 PM permalink
Wizard
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Member since: Oct 23, 2012
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Fecha: 12-11-12
Palabra: Furibundo


Today's SWD means furious.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast furibundo y furioso. I tend to think that furibundo conveys more of comedy, for example a child throwing a tantrum, but could easily be wrong about that.

Ejemplo time.

El Capitán siempre lo golpea a Gilligan con su sombrero cuando está furibundo. = The Skipper always hits Gilligan with his hat when he is furious.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 12th, 2012 at 7:15:49 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 313
Posts: 10670
Quote: Wizard
El Capitán siempre lo golpea a Gilligan con su sombrero cuando está furibundo. = The Skipper always hits Gilligan with his hat when he is furious.


Lose the "lo." Otherwise it's ok.

The word itself is not used often. It's one of those you recognize and understand, but never consider using.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
November 12th, 2012 at 9:20:27 PM permalink
Wizard
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Member since: Oct 23, 2012
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Fecha: 13-11-12
Palabra: Terquear


Today's SWD means to become stubborn/obstinate. A related word, and probably more frequently seen, is terco, which means stubborn.

Ejemplo time.

El Capitán se vuelve terco cuando se está enojado. = The Skipper becomes stubborn when he gets mad.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 13th, 2012 at 7:31:06 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 313
Posts: 10670
Quote: Wizard
Today's SWD means to become stubborn/obstinate.


Sounds right, but I've never come across it before.

Quote:
El Capitán se vuelve terco cuando se está enojado. = The Skipper becomes stubborn when he gets mad.


You won't like this, though Paco may be able to explain it. "El Capitán se PONE terco..."
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.