I Quit My Job

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July 20th, 2014 at 5:50:23 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 95
Posts: 5853
Quote: boymimbo
Face kind of reminds me of the guy in Office Space (main character) who quit his meaningless job and went into construction.

I'm not an outdoors person (not manly, according to EB and AZ's world) and really couldn't see myself doing construction. But I think there are alot of tangible things that I could do to help people.

Despite the difficult time I gave Face, he will probably be okay. More than okay. He's already got a leg up on some unemployed people. He's willing and capable of doing *anything*.


The past few years I have really gotten tired of the grind that is a normal job. I mean, in pest control I simply hated going in to the office eventually, but then I just wanted a job more in finance or banking. But now, after like 5 layoffs since 2008, and you read that right I can't even remember without paper and pencil, and leaving another job or two because layoff was immenent, well free-agency is just better.

A fellow dealer I know is equally sick of the grind. He said he would rather collect cans, hustle a few bucks, work his daily free-play route in Vegas, then play poker all night and grind cash out. Not exactly welding, I guess, but a plan.

We are so programed to get that full-time job in the nice place with A/C and free parking that we put up with anything. Face is about 10 years younger than me, and I see a guy with the exact same frustrations I had when I was a manager and at about the same age I was at the time. This is not uncommon.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
July 20th, 2014 at 11:35:57 AM permalink
boymimbo
Member since: Mar 25, 2013
Threads: 5
Posts: 610
Speaking of manly, I did do the manly duty of home dishwashing repair. The wife complained that the dishes weren't getting clean, and rather than spend $150 on a service call, I took the dishwasher apart including the bottom part where the filter was, cleaned out everything with soap and water, cleaned out the bottom where the filter was (lots of shells and crap that the grinder couldn't resolve), and put it back together. 1 hour spent, dishes clean, $150 saved. I even had the right tools to do the job (okay, all I needed was screwdriver with the proper bit, but still, the bit was not a standard one) and I consulted the u-tube videos to help me figure out how to take it apart and put it together.

I even wore shorts with my belt done up tight so that i wouldn't have the plumber butt.

My wife was happy, "yeah, you're a man, alright".
July 20th, 2014 at 12:51:46 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 111
Posts: 4445
Quote: Face
That leads me to here. I look back at my former jobs and realize I fell ass backwards into every one. I've never had a job I wanted, just one that was available. The two positions I held in gaming were things I had no idea even existed. Yet for 6 years, I had an awesome job with good pay, excellent benefits and perks, relatively close to home. I got that job by random chance. I had no idea it existed. It makes me wonder what else I have no idea about.


To be Frank (Shirley you jest)

I think you're violating the Wiz's signature rule. (his literal signature)

Outcome vs good bets.

The goal is to practice good betting strategy regardless of outcome.

If you walk blindfolded across a street multiple times, not getting hit is not proof it was a good decision process.

But, you know, I understand the rest of it.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
July 20th, 2014 at 12:52:49 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10181
I think Face was let go because he got caught
in the coat room with a drink server again. I
know the suits at my local casino are always
hitting on the dolls, and there are some really
good looking ones too.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
July 20th, 2014 at 1:09:31 PM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 95
Posts: 5853
Quote: Evenbob
I think Face was let go because he got caught
in the coat room with a drink server again. I
know the suits at my local casino are always
hitting on the dolls, and there are some really
good looking ones too.


Making cocktail waitresses 2 at a time? Players couldn't get a drink at the tables?
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
July 20th, 2014 at 1:25:03 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10181
Quote: AZDuffman
Making cocktail waitresses 2 at a time?


If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
July 20th, 2014 at 3:53:13 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 3031
Quote: odiousgambit

What I'm getting at is this: no job doesn't have its problems, its disillusions. Wise fellow I used to work with always said leaving one job for another is often just trading one set of problems for another.

No point in beating you up for leaving that job. You had your reasons, and probably aren't telling us all of them. But I think the disillusionment thing with a new job, I'm worried about that for you.


I understand. I'm not delusional. I know there doesn't exist a perfect job. But when you add the good with the bad, you should be left with a positive remainder. If not, why stay?

I know so many people that slug along in jobs they hate. Why? That makes less than no sense to me. You have a choice, and you're choosing to be unhappy for the majority of your life. For what? Because someone says so? For a pension? Because you're scared of the alternative?

No thanks. Life's short, be happy.

Quote: AZDuffman
If a person is not afraid to get their hands dirty there is no limit to what you can do.


That's how I feel. In a pinch, I could always be a "man with a van". There's not a thing in a house I can't do, from simple stuff like borders and painting/staining to electrical and structural, roofing and siding, whatever needs be done. I just hours ago got approached by my neighbor who knocked the guide wheel off his mower deck. I told him to bring it over and had it welded back on in 15 minutes (gratis, of course). Here in the sticks, there's always issues like that. Shock mounts getting broke off in potholes, front ends being obliterated by deer, and every single one I could fix in my garage.

My race car trailer is something I could build within a week. The cheapest I've ever seen one go for is $2,100. Garden sheds? Those are a grand, I could build them to suit in two days. I made stuff around the house for an "Americana" feel, stuff like toothbrush holders out of Bell mason jars. Didn't even take 45 minutes, and I see them on Ebay for $50+. Ash is very crafty and makes her own decorations, relying on me for the saw / sand / construct part. She showed me how much we could buy some of that stuff for, and it blew my mind. I could churn them out all day long, and drink beer while I do it, all in the comfort of my own shop.

On the "real job" front, I'm also not worried. Surveillance was very in depth, tons to learn. I got 90 days to learn the basics. On day 3 I asked to take the test, took it, and scored 3rd highest out of everyone there. It doesn't matter what it is, I can hop in and pick it up immediately. About the only thing I am completely prevented from doing is LEO / Peace Officer stuff, because of my colorblindness.

Christ, you know how many single mom's there are out there? I could start up a Ron Swanson summer rec / outdoorsman camp for kids without dads. The possibilities are endless, my worries nonexistent.

Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
July 20th, 2014 at 4:30:57 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 105
Posts: 10181
Single women out there? That's the last
thing you need, women tend to screw
up your life, not enhance it. But you
know that already..
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
July 20th, 2014 at 4:35:24 PM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 95
Posts: 5853
Quote: Face




That's how I feel. In a pinch, I could always be a "man with a van". There's not a thing in a house I can't do, from simple stuff like borders and painting/staining to electrical and structural, roofing and siding, whatever needs be done. I just hours ago got approached by my neighbor who knocked the guide wheel off his mower deck. I told him to bring it over and had it welded back on in 15 minutes (gratis, of course). Here in the sticks, there's always issues like that. Shock mounts getting broke off in potholes, front ends being obliterated by deer, and every single one I could fix in my garage.

My race car trailer is something I could build within a week. The cheapest I've ever seen one go for is $2,100. Garden sheds? Those are a grand, I could build them to suit in two days. I made stuff around the house for an "Americana" feel, stuff like toothbrush holders out of Bell mason jars. Didn't even take 45 minutes, and I see them on Ebay for $50+. Ash is very crafty and makes her own decorations, relying on me for the saw / sand / construct part. She showed me how much we could buy some of that stuff for, and it blew my mind. I could churn them out all day long, and drink beer while I do it, all in the comfort of my own shop.


As far as the "man with a "van" thing, look at courrier work. Pay isn't great, but if you do have a van or a truck you can sometimes get some decent runs. I've done it, but would consider it "fill in" work.

But seriously, you are right on the way. I don't know how much you can source for free from other people's "junk" but I'd say build a trailer at a time, see how it goes. Just be careful not to confuse the "on eBay for" with "sold on eBay for." Give the crafts a go, drop a few at local antique shops in that town near Salameca, ski resort the name escapes me for now, offer them on consignment. Get a blast cabinet and do my idea of a sign saying "small items sandblasted and welded." Let me know how that one goes.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
July 20th, 2014 at 10:19:06 PM permalink
beachbumbabs
Member since: Sep 3, 2013
Threads: 5
Posts: 671
Face,

I am sitting here open-mouthed at your audacity and nerve. And applauding your move to be your own person and live bigger than your job. I was lucky enough to stumble into my career without knowing what I was getting into. It was incredibly rewarding, exciting, and lucrative. Before that, I had over 10 years of soul-deadening menial work in offices, restaurants, and light industry (though quite a bit of it was while I was paying for school), so I understand what that rut feels like.

I think there's a reflection of your personality between this decision and the edge of risk you like in your life. Hockey, auto-racing, high-speed motorcycling and trick cycling, they're all part of living on the edge. So it seems like you should be looking at creative, adrenalin-rush, physically demanding work with tangible results. There's more of that available out there than you might think, just because it demands so much of the individual, though most of what I'm thinking of would probably require you to either move or travel extensively, and I don't know how that fits with Ash and your son. But it could be done.

Handyman could work, I guess, especially in this expendable society. An awful lot of people would rather not be throwing things away after 2-5 years that used to last 20 or more. So maybe a pick-up-and-refurbish small and large appliances would appeal, with your interest in gadgetry and skills in welding and repair. But a few things off the top of my head:

Oil and gas in North Dakota, where they pay big, have tough winters and less than 3% unemployment. You're used to the weather and you like being rural. Pretty great people up there. Rewarding industry.

Smoke jumper, responding to wildfires (mostly out west) during the fire season (now) and making enough to pay for an entire year in just 3-4 months. Ridiculously hard, exhilarating, incredibly rewarding. My ex has a buddy from the service that just retired after 30 years of it.

Alaska fishermen have a 4-5 month season, work their asses off, and that pays their whole year. I know a couple guys who only go up for the season. A slightly easier but similar trade for great money up there is crew on Aleutian Island cargo boats. I have a friend who captains there commercially; gone for 4 months, down here for 8. Again, makes enough for the whole year in that small amount of time.

My grandfather was a surveyor for the Hudson's Bay Company in the 20's thru the 50's. He traveled above the Arctic Circle with a guide, months at a time, and was the first white man to see many parts of the Northwest Territories. Surveyors can find work all over the world, as can field geologists and their crew.

Tower worker, maintaining cells and other installs on high steel structures. Light electronics, good fitness, hazard pay most places because of the climbing. Lots of travel within a region, and lots of work since the cellular explosion.

Please don't become a mercenary. However, if you want to work in aviation, I might be able to provide some leads, especially if you're willing to go to the Mideast.

I don't know if you're finding any of that helpful, but maybe something there will pique your interest. I'm cheering for you; let me know if I can help.
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die. -ersatz Buddha
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