I Quit My Job

August 13th, 2014 at 4:17:12 PM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 95
Posts: 5601
Quote: Face
No disrespect taken. I'd rather hear "you're #%$^ing up" and fix it, than "good idea" and get screwed.

But, unless I'm misunderstanding, I think I already did that part. Hockey and racing are obvious dead ends, so the outdoors is obvious. That, of course, led me to the DEC. In there, there's about 7 or so main categories that then branch out into their individual specialties, and just about any one I could see myself doing. I went with Aquatic Biologist and Forester because they were the most desirable.


You probably have, what I put is the same advice I give to most people who are considering a career change. I have a pet peeve of people (not saying you) who think that when they get their BS Degree some magic happens and people rush up and offer you jobs. I worked with one guy, good guy but he kept taking call center jobs he hated. He kept saying how he "needs his degree" when I told him I had mine and I am sitting here talking to you (him) so think about that. The week I left a guy with an MBA started in our group, which amazed me.

You seem to have plans for the degree, but shop around first. I always say a degree gets you just one job. Some place will hire right out of your class. After that it is all what you did and what you know.

As to the DEC, approach with caution. You will never make decent money there and while it was almost 15 years ago, when I dealt with them they were always short on their budget. They could not afford $50 in gas and tolls to send a spokesperson to our meeting, and they could not let us pay. Positions were always empty. I half-hearted tried to get to Kodak via them where you worked onsite as a DEC agent then Kodak hired you. Never worked out. Try if you like, but buyer beware. Work in the compliance end for an oil and gas drill service company. Or at least check it out.
The man who damns money has obtained it dishonorably; the man who respects it has earned it
August 13th, 2014 at 4:45:48 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 101
Posts: 9761
I say go with what you're already good at and
like, screw school. It's a lot of money to lay
out for what might happen. You already have
a skill set, use it. Going to school is just a way
to postpone what you know you're going to do
already.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
August 13th, 2014 at 5:02:58 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 593
A friend of mine has a Master's Degree in Forestry Science from the University of Montana. He now owns a lawn mowing service.
August 13th, 2014 at 6:00:36 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 101
Posts: 9761
Quote: DRich
A friend of mine has a Master's Degree in Forestry Science from the University of Montana. He now owns a lawn mowing service.


That was my point. The only guaranteed jobs now
are in engineering and that involves expensive
schools and lots of math.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
August 13th, 2014 at 6:48:57 PM permalink
TheCesspit
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 23
Posts: 1887
Start with a High School Math course, and nail it. Or not. But that way you know where to focus next to see if college degrees with higher math is worth pursuing.

Personally, I think many degrees are over-rated (and I have two) as ways of getting a job, unless you passionate about the subject. Then do it for it's own sake. Worry about what opportunities it will bring afterwards. Otherwise, make hay now, and pursue the passions out of work or in related fields.

The one advantage I have had in education is that the UK government paid for my first degree and a large Japanese multi-national for the second. My advice may be different if I'd had to fork over $10,000's... I did have to pay living expenses in part for the degrees, but my student debt was small compared to people these days.
It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die.... it's called Life
August 13th, 2014 at 7:42:58 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 101
Posts: 9761
Quote: TheCesspit
Personally, I think many degrees are over-rated (and I have two) as ways of getting a job, unless you passionate about the subject. Then do it for it's own sake. Worry about what opportunities it will bring afterwards. Otherwise, make hay now, and pursue the passions out of work or in related fields.
.


Couldn't agree more. Most degree's are an expensive
waste of time if you're over 30. Find something you
like, get in at the bottom, and spend your time excelling
and moving up, instead of treading water in school.
Companies would rather have a smart hard worker
than a douchebag with a couple degrees.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
August 13th, 2014 at 7:48:36 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 110
Posts: 4247
Try not to do this:

Ten years from now- look back on the last ten years and be sorry you didn't use that 10 years to take the path you did not take.

'cause that 10 years is not coming back.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
August 14th, 2014 at 6:26:02 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 70
Posts: 1471
Quote: AZDuffman
I have a pet peeve of people (not saying you) who think that when they get their BS Degree some magic happens and people rush up and offer you jobs.


Quote: Evenbob
Couldn't agree more. Most degree's are an expensive waste of time if you're over 30.


I am in agreement here, Face. IMO the whole secondary education racket [yep want that word emphasized] is a monumental scandal that is swept under the rug, has been forever, and powerful vested interests are the reason it isn't accepted as common knowledge. Actually the latest development of online colleges just taking people's money and [here was their mistake] monumentally worsening the student loan problem that exists today may finally be shining some light on that scandalous racket.

Math: I am convinced being good at it is a matter of learning a special language as much as anything. However, it is a language that is learned perhaps not in the normal 'language' part of the brain, so that confuses the student, kills it for vast numbers. That's my theory anyway, and I think studies on this left side/ right side brain kind of support that I think. I did OK in math but when it comes to being surprised to find yourself in a 'remedial' position there ain't nothing like math! Nothing! Even the Wizard has hinted as to this [but I may have misinterpreted a remark]. Maybe more on that later, but remedialism is a problem for even the most sincere education programs.

As EB has said, no point in talking to you like I was your father. On the other hand, if you are going to try to get that Bachelor of Science [not a BA please] for the kind of work you are entertaining, with huge remedial problems in math, and no job, geez guy I hope some Dad or dad figure somewhere can foot the expenses. Wow.
Mustard:You like Kipling, Miss Scarlet? Sure, I'll eat anything [from movie]
August 14th, 2014 at 12:28:18 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 101
Posts: 9761
When you're over 30, you get hired because of
experience and who you are as a person. A degree
doesn't mean squat unless it's a very specialized
field. And then they'll hire somebody younger
with a degree because they can pay him less.

When you're 22 you need a degree to get in the
door, you have nothing else. At 32, they look at
you, your degree means little.

My son is leaving the AF as a major and getting a
job at a major airline. He has two degree's in
aeronautics. Do the airlines he interviews with care
about his degree's? Not one has mentioned them.
All they care about is his 12 years of flying in 4
different aircraft, his rank, and his record.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
August 16th, 2014 at 2:43:53 AM permalink
beachbumbabs
Member since: Sep 3, 2013
Threads: 5
Posts: 671
It is not my impression that the water works are restricted to federal or other authorities. There are many research facilities here in Florida (as one geographic example), nearly all private, concentrating on sea life, fish/mammals/plants/ecosystems. The fishing industry does a lot of work as well. If you get the skills (SCUBA, for example) along with a mate's license, demonstrate the aptitude, are able to communicate effectively orally and written, basic computer skills, there are a lot of jobs open to you. The fact that you're a risk-taker is an asset in some of those jobs (more than a few involve hazard pay), as well as being a self-sufficient loner (by preference) as well as capable of leading a team (I'm assuming here). You are simply not as limited as this thread seems to suggest.

Dream big, and make it happen. Just because you won't be qualified tomorrow doesn't mean the training and opportunities aren't there for the taking.
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die. -ersatz Buddha