What If....

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November 5th, 2014 at 11:15:55 AM permalink
Face
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Quote: Nareed
As I understand it, Charles de Gaulle is dead.


But Joan Osborne is not =)

Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
November 5th, 2014 at 11:26:31 AM permalink
TheCesspit
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 23
Posts: 1929
If 'ifs' and 'ands' were pots and pans, we'd have no need for tinkers.
It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die.... it's called Life
November 5th, 2014 at 1:17:25 PM permalink
Face
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If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, then everyday would be Erntedankfest.

Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
November 20th, 2014 at 3:29:09 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 117
Posts: 4858
The nematode worm was completely neurally mapped. It's neural map was transplanted as software into a Lego Mindstorms EV3 robot.

With no further instructions, the neural map provided the robot with behaviors.

What is the question?

No one has ever proven I am not God.
November 20th, 2014 at 4:00:17 PM permalink
aceofspades
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 426
Quote: Nareed
What if the universe is not eternal but existence is?



We are all made of stars.
November 20th, 2014 at 4:01:07 PM permalink
aceofspades
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 49
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Quote: Face
If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, then everyday would be Erntedankfest.




This belongs in THE OFFICE (US) forum
December 18th, 2014 at 7:08:16 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 313
Posts: 10663
What if we find life on Mars?

If we do, we're most likely to find "simple" life such as bacteria and perhaps other once-celled organisms.

If we find these, then what?

It depends. We may find they're nearly identical to similar life on Earth. If so, then they may show only adaptations not possible or not likely on Earth (say to UV light, near-vacuum and so on).

If it's different, then we may discover something completely amazing. Perhaps a different mechanism for inheritance altogether, perhaps the absence of something thus far deemed essential, perhaps something else.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
December 18th, 2014 at 3:24:04 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 117
Posts: 4858
Quote: Nareed
What if we find life on Mars?

If we do, we're most likely to find "simple" life such as bacteria and perhaps other once-celled organisms.

If we find these, then what?


We conquer them and plant a flag?

Newspapers not being what they once were, I can hardly look forward to the headline in capital letters befitting such a discovery. Guess it will be virtual mostly.

If we find something the nature of it will play a significant part in our future theorizing, of what to expect around the Universe.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
December 19th, 2014 at 6:41:19 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 313
Posts: 10663
Quote: rxwine
If we find something the nature of it will play a significant part in our future theorizing, of what to expect around the Universe.


One important principle in scientific studies is to examine different varieties of the same thing. For example, if you tried to develop biology based only on the heart cells of cows, you'd have a very hard time doing so. It would be far easier if you examined many cells from many types of organisms.

One problem with biology is that all life on Earth is related. Thus even though we can see differences between plant, fungal and animal cells, we still have studied only one very large sample of life. If we were to find some different type of life, not related to Earth's, we might be able to advance biology even further.

This is also the case for planets. Until recently we knew only nine planets (eight?), and we tried to posit theories of planetary formation based on that. When we began to finally discover planets elsewhere, we were immediately surprised by how unlike the Solar System planets these are. Gas giants in close orbits of their stars, for one.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
December 19th, 2014 at 12:57:29 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 117
Posts: 4858
Quote: Nareed
One important principle in scientific studies is to examine different varieties of the same thing. For example, if you tried to develop biology based only on the heart cells of cows, you'd have a very hard time doing so. It would be far easier if you examined many cells from many types of organisms.

One problem with biology is that all life on Earth is related. Thus even though we can see differences between plant, fungal and animal cells, we still have studied only one very large sample of life. If we were to find some different type of life, not related to Earth's, we might be able to advance biology even further.

This is also the case for planets. Until recently we knew only nine planets (eight?), and we tried to posit theories of planetary formation based on that. When we began to finally discover planets elsewhere, we were immediately surprised by how unlike the Solar System planets these are. Gas giants in close orbits of their stars, for one.


I guess I would say, whatever we find, it will be easier to start hypothesizing from that example than guess some opposite or different idea.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
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