The smirky, smarmy charm of Atë!

September 4th, 2016 at 11:03:48 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Homer's Iliad (Book 19) depicts Atë as the eldest daughter of Zeus (with no mother mentioned). On Hera's instigation, Atë used her influence over Zeus so that he swore an oath that on that day a mortal descended from him would be born who would become a great ruler. Hera immediately arranged to delay the birth of Heracles and to bring forth Eurystheus prematurely. In anger Zeus threw Atë down to earth forever, forbidding her return to heaven or to Mt. Olympus. Atë then wandered about, treading on the heads of men rather than on the earth, wreaking havoc on mortals.



And Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice
Cry “Havoc!” and let slip the dogs of war,
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.

- Only one of Shakespeare's speech to include Atë.

Why is Atë so completely missing from the commercial world of media about the supernatural? Loki (Thor's brother) the Norwegian god who is the equivalent to Greek goddess Atë is fairly prominent.

September 4th, 2016 at 11:53:23 AM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 106
Posts: 10690
'Treading on the heads' might be a reason. What
does that even mean. And she's a woman, not
a sexy guy with a big hammer. Women are never
very believable when they do superhero guy type
stuff. They usually come across as super lesbians.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
September 4th, 2016 at 12:17:47 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
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These days being a lesbian would assure box office revenue. I do however think treading on men's heads is figurative as in after defeating them in battle or something and being elevated or elated at victory of a man.

Neither Homer nor Shakespeare were ever known as sticklers for the truth. The Globe Theater was the ante-room of a whorehouse so who really needed precision in such circumstances.
September 4th, 2016 at 1:40:06 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Fleastiff
I do however think treading on men's heads is figurative as in after defeating them in battle or something and being elevated or elated at victory of a man.


Another translation of the illiad says she "pass through men's minds".

Quote: Illiad Bk XIX:74-144 Agamemnon speaks of Ate

The bronze-greaved Greeks were delighted by his speech, overjoyed that Peleus’ great son had renounced his anger. King Agamemnon, sitting, due to his wound, rather than standing to address them, now had his say: ‘My friends, Danaan warriors, servants of Ares, it is good to grant a speaker an uninterrupted hearing, interruptions trouble even the skilled orator. And how can anyone speak or hear in a babble of noise? Even the clearest voice would go unheard. What I say is aimed at the son of Peleus, but you other Argives should listen and take note.

You Achaeans have often criticised me as he has done, but the fault was not mine. Zeus, Fate, and the Fury who walks in darkness are to blame, for blinding my judgement that day in the assembly when on my own authority I confiscated Achilles’ prize. What choice did I have? There is a goddess who decides these things, Ate, Zeus’ eldest daughter, blinds us all, accursed as she is. Those tender feet of hers never touch the ground, but pass through men’s minds causing harm, ensnaring this one or another.

Even Zeus they say was blinded by her once, though he’s supreme among gods and men. Hera it was, a mere woman, cunningly tricked him, when Alcmene was due to bear the mighty Heracles in turreted Thebes. Zeus had made a proud boast to the immortals: ‘Listen, gods and goddesses, while I speak what my heart prompts. This very day Eileithyia, goddess of childbirth, will bring a boy-child into the world, born of a race descended from me, who will hold power over all his neighbours. Then it was Queen Hera showed her cunning: ‘As usual, you’ll play the deceiver, and nothing will come of your words. So then, Olympian, give us instead your solemn oath that the man, born of your stock, who issues from between a woman’s thighs today, will indeed hold power over all his neighbours.’ Zeus, misled by her cunning, in his blindness swore a mighty oath. Then Hera darted swiftly from high Olympus to Argos in Achaea where she knew that Nicippe, noble wife of Sthenelus, Perseus’ son, was seven months pregnant with a boy-child. Hera induced the child prematurely, while restraining the Eileithyiae, and delaying Alcmene’s labour. Then she told Zeus, son of Cronos, the news: ‘Father Zeus, lord of the lightning-flash, a word with you. That mighty man is born indeed who shall rule the Argives, fitting, truly, for a child of your lineage. It is Eurystheus, a boy-child for Sthenelus, Perseus’ son.’ At her words he felt a sharp pain deep in his mind, and in a blaze of anger he at once seized Ate by her gleaming tresses, swearing a mighty oath that she who blinds us all should never again be found on Olympus or in the starry heavens. With that, he whirled her round and flung her from the sky down to the ploughed fields of men below. Zeus would think of her and groan later, whenever he saw his dear son Heracles toiling at Eurystheus’ labours.

I too, when great Hector of the gleaming helm was slaughtering Argives by the sterns of our ships, could not forget that Ate who had blinded me before. But since I was blinded indeed, and Zeus robbed me of my senses, I’ll make amends and compensate you richly. I am ready to offer you all the gifts that noble Odysseus promised when he visited your hut the night before last. So prepare for battle and rouse your men. Or you can wait a little, despite your eagerness for war, if you wish, and my attendants will bring you the gifts from my ship, so you can see I give you what will ease your heart.’


Certainly she is as interesting as Amazons In Greek mythology, (Greek: Ἀμαζόνες ) who were a race of woman warriors. Wonder Woman is an Amazon.

Quote: Fleastiff
Neither Homer nor Shakespeare were ever known as sticklers for the truth.

I don't think they ever claimed to be. Historical information was just material for Shakespeare to build his characters.

Quote: Fleastiff
The Globe Theater was the ante-room of a whorehouse so who really needed precision in such circumstances.

I know that the Globe was in a rough section of town south of the river, where there were certainly whore houses as well as bear-baiting rings. Shakespeare certainly made vulgar double entendre's to appeal to all classes of people, but I never heard the ante-room reference.
September 5th, 2016 at 2:45:20 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
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Quote: Pacomartin
Why is Atë so completely missing


says right there, because the gods were angry. Always explains a lot. How do you pronounce Atë anyway?
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September 5th, 2016 at 6:24:03 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Pacomartin
Homer's Iliad (Book 19) depicts Atë as the eldest daughter of Zeus (with no mother mentioned).


Parentage isn't as clear cut with Greek gods. Athena sprang forth from the head of Zeus, fully grown and armed.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
September 5th, 2016 at 6:43:02 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: odiousgambit
How do you pronounce Atë anyway?


The "Let Slip the Dogs of War" Speech is about 1.5 minutes, and Atë is at around 1 minute. Pronounced Ah-tay with emphasis on last syllable.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgcI-iGO0TQ

Classic image of the goddess, and a rare modern image with her walking on the heads of men.