Dog Talk

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December 23rd, 2014 at 2:33:40 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 593
Quote: Evenbob

If everybody in the world had a Bichon, there
would never be another war, too many happy
people.


Oh my, that is awesome. I never realized EB had a heart.
December 23rd, 2014 at 7:56:31 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 110
Posts: 4247
Need a trained dog?

Quote:
You do not need to pay any money to adopt an MWD. Your only expense will be for the transportation of your new friend.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
December 24th, 2014 at 3:53:57 AM permalink
chickenman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 0
Posts: 368
Quote: AZDuffman

That being said, I say just go to the dog pound. Make your list of attributes which you already started with 30lbs and such. Look at a few. Then, and this is the important part, let the dog choose you. Same as the smart man picks a woman who seems to like him, find the dog that bonds with you from the get-go. It will come right up to you and it will just feel right.

Best part about the pound is you will feel so much better than if you drive halfway to Albany in the night or to Horseheads in a snowstorm because you wanted some special breed. All those good dogs stuck in pounds and I know people who go through I will not say what to get some designer dog. So what if it is a mutt, so am I, It will love you just as much, it will be less a target for thieves, and it will probably be of better health in the long term.

A word of warning, though, find one that has been at the pound a short time and do not take the hard-case nobody will adopt for behavior problems. Your name is not Ceaser and you are not out to save the world. Shelters that keep dogs for life for years going crazy mean too well and should learn when the end is the end.

Do keep us updated.
Yes, go to a pound or rescue shelter. Free one of the inmates and you'll be rewarded for life.

DON'T make a list of attributes, you'll know it when you see it. Make return trips weekly until you see the right one, then set it free.

We rescued an Old English Sheepdog 35 years ago. Love at first sight. Was around one year old, 78 pounds, incredibly matted and loaded with fleas. Picked him up, immediately took to dog groomer to be bathed and fur cut down nearly to the skin. Kept him in a puppy-clip after that and we were both happy about that decision. He had been abused and was in lock-up for snapping at someone, but given love and affection he soon got rid of behavior problems. I think he had been chronically kicked because he retained a dislike of boots.

Warning: most big chested dogs are prone to bloat. This guy lived to be 15 before suddenly succumbing to it.
He's everywhere, he's everywhere...!
December 24th, 2014 at 5:43:10 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 70
Posts: 1471
We recently picked up an Aussie Blue Heeler [which we suspect is a mix] from the pound and I can highly recommend this dog, if you don't need a hunting dog. 18 months old, looks like an old yeller dog, turned in for economic reasons, we lucked out bigtime, what a great dog! BTW the show dogs of this breed have been selected for good looks, but I am convinced the typical Australian dog looks like mine ... yes, don't pay a bunch of money, rescue a pound dog!

I'll leave my extensive opinions about not making a dog gun-shy in a spoiler box below.

things to look for with a pound dog IMO,

*house-broken
*up to date with shots etc
*fixed
*good with cats



we needed this last feature, and you may not, but I tell you what, it is an indication you are getting a well socialized dog whether or not you actually have a cat.

Wow, do I have strong opinions on this. Every dog, hunting dogs included, can be *made* gun-shy by stupidity. Classic case: half-ass hunter brings dog to the field without any exposure to guns. Dumba$$ fires a shotgun right over the dog clobbering his ears! Shocked and stunned dog wants nothing to do with guns ever again. What a shame.

Correct training is something like this. Stand at least 30 yds away with gun loaded with .22 shorts pointed away from the dog. After firing the gun [which just sounds like a loud pop and won't hurt ears] encourage the dog to come to you and feed it a treat. Repeat until clearly the dog gets excited seeing you with the gun [classic Pavlov]. Go up to .22 LR and other possible incremental increase in sound. When finally in the field with the dog, continue to feed treats after each shot. If the dog is for hunting, the treat will gradually become bagging the game. Believe me, the dog "gets it" quickly with this. If not for hunting, I'd continue with treats but after a proper period it does not have to be after each shot.

Please do not assume your dog will naturally not be gun-shy!
Mustard:You like Kipling, Miss Scarlet? Sure, I'll eat anything [from movie]
December 24th, 2014 at 2:12:19 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 2986
Interesting. I never even heard of a heeler until this thread. A bit of reading shows me you guys get it. It seems perfect =)

Funny about the cat vs dog thing. I appreciate both, and seem to have had good luck with cats. I've only had one long term, a Himalayan / Persian type. It was a rescue and totally skittish at first. Once acclimated, he was all cat. Prissy, high-browed, self absorbed. We were here to serve and little else. It wasn't a snuggle cat, not by a long walk. Hell, you could barely pet the thing.

When I was at my worst with the depression and drugs, I'd often hole up in the basement for days at a time. I lived in the shadows, waking up around 4p and going to bed by 7a. Only came out for food and toilet. Wouldn't you know, that damn cat came down once. It never came downstairs, and never sought affection. But he came down, hopped onto the raised end of my recliner, and just sat there.

He did it every night after. About 1 - 2 in the morning, the door would waft open and he'd come in trailing his long mane of fur. He still never cuddled, never cozied up, but he'd always hop onto that recliner and just sit with me through the night, purring away. He was a good cat =)

Re the gun stuff, it seems obvious, but good to know. I never trained my dog for guns, but I do remember it was the one thing that scared her. Loud cars, fireworks, lightning, none of that phased her. But the one time I shot near her sent her running. She cowered anytime I brought one out from there after.

Probably should've started at 30 paces and worked from there. Thanks, OG =)
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
December 24th, 2014 at 2:56:41 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 110
Posts: 4247
Quote: Face
Probably should've started at 30 paces and worked from there.


I'm sure it's something along those lines.

Some prank show, they roll a cannon into a guy's bedroom where he is sound asleep and fire it off. Cannon, not a gun.
Hard to develop calm reactions at such a beginning.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
December 24th, 2014 at 3:15:14 PM permalink
aceofspades
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 426
Face - do you want to borrow my pup to get a sense of what owning a high maintenance dog is like?


December 24th, 2014 at 4:43:15 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 12
Posts: 1598
Quote: aceofspades
Face - do you want to borrow my pup to get a sense of what owning a high maintenance dog is like?




I'll take him for an hour or two, I think that is all I could afford.

On another point. My kids were raised with boxers. Two have since obtained their own. It is also a consideration that sometimes you get what you pay for.

Having a really good and well trained one is not like owning a dog. Incredible animals, many that have had them will never experiment with another breed, it really isn't like having "a dog". Of course, IMO.

Nice looking boy you got there, ace.
Everyone gets thrown from the plane to maintain altitude
December 24th, 2014 at 4:48:13 PM permalink
aceofspades
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 426
Quote: petroglyph
Quote: aceofspades
Face - do you want to borrow my pup to get a sense of what owning a high maintenance dog is like?




I'll take him for an hour or two, I think that is all I could afford.

On another point. My kids were raised with boxers. Two have since obtained their own. It is also a consideration that sometimes you get what you pay for.

Having a really good and well trained one is not like owning a dog. Incredible animals, many that have had them will never experiment with another breed, it really isn't like having "a dog". Of course, IMO.

Nice looking boy you got there, ace.


Thanks - he is like a bull in a china shop
150 pounds of drool, snoring, eating and passing gas lol
I will have to decorate my condo when he is no longer with me as he has scratched up the hardwood and destroyed my couches......but I wouldn't trade it in for the world
December 24th, 2014 at 5:14:09 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 12
Posts: 1598
I like to let them go ahead of me on the trails just to keep the dust down.

He does look like he drools a little, but his eyes are clear and not all boogered up and his nose isn't running.

There is always tile floors, hardwood floors are a pain anyway.

It appears he is getting some grey on his muzzle.
Everyone gets thrown from the plane to maintain altitude
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