Future: DC yes, AC no?

June 26th, 2016 at 12:33:55 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 12
Posts: 1940
Quote: Pacomartin
It would seem that the 10% tolerance applies to the USA as well.
That is where I learned of the allowable tolerance. I was working in Alaska when I questioned engineering about the large swing in voltages between houses.

My question arose do to the utility having us capture two legs from a 3 phase 120/208 transformer for a house service, never intending to give the customer 240.
Everyone gets thrown from the plane to maintain altitude
June 26th, 2016 at 9:24:03 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 706
Posts: 8142
Quote: Nareed
Sorry, I just paid the last bill, and it was about US $180 for the past two months. It's outrageously high.


That's about $90 a month. Normally across the board there is a 39% correction factor for PPP comparison between Mexico and the USA. So what costs $90 in Mexico is $125 in the USA for the average price of goods and service. Obviously applying one percentage adjustment is fairly ridiculous as not everything adjust evenly, but it is a fiction that economists seem to live with.

The traditional 39% would obviously have to be adjusted since the dollar has grown so strong in recent years. Also, these rates are average per month, where the average American residence uses 911 kWh per month (much higher than the average Mexican residence).

South Carolina and Alabama are good examples of states that use electricity for both air conditioning and for heating. The rates in South Carolina is 12.77 cents per kWh and in Alabama 12.42 cents per kWh. Both are pretty close to the national average of 12.43 cents per kWh. But because of the double use of electricity, the bills are high. Connecticut (21.15 cents per kWh) and Hawaii (26.93 cents per kWh) just have very high rates.

Utah and New Mexico have very low rates combined with very low usage.

Average monthly bills residential electricity
$187.59 Hawaii
$147.74 South Carolina
$145.25 Alabama
$144.10 Connecticut
$141.22 Mississippi
$139.68 Maryland
$137.39 Texas
$134.14 Georgia
$132.76 Tennessee
$130.04 Virginia
$129.86 Florida
$126.26 Delaware
$126.09 North Carolina
$123.61 Louisiana
$120.51 Arizona
$119.66 Kentucky
$118.63 New York
$116.47 Missouri
$115.79 Alaska
$115.64 Nevada
$115.56 Indiana
$114.17 Oklahoma
$114.09 U.S. Total
$113.72 Pennsylvania
$113.39 North Dakota
$112.95 Kansas
$112.62 Ohio
$109.45 South Dakota
$108.63 Arkansas
$108.57 New Hampshire
$108.14 West Virginia
$106.94 Massachusetts
$106.33 Nebraska
$105.65 New Jersey
$100.09 Rhode Island
$99.49 Iowa
$99.34 Vermont
$97.29 Oregon
$97.26 Minnesota
$95.50 Idaho
$94.88 Wisconsin
$94.52 Michigan
$91.90 District of Columbia
$91.26 California
$90.60 Wyoming
$88.78 Illinois
$87.14 Washington
$86.93 Montana
$83.91 Maine
$83.73 Colorado
$79.49 Utah
$77.79 New Mexico

If the DC transmission people have their way, electricity will be more uniformly priced around the country. Obviously they say it will be uniformly priced lower, but that remains to be seen once the infrastructure is built.
June 26th, 2016 at 9:39:18 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4578
Just a word of warning about 'average' electrical bills.. in Florida they have a program that smooths out the electrical bill to approximately the same each month so that in the extreme months of June, July and August you avoid any whoppingly high bill. Obviously, at some time they settle up on the 'synthetic bill' versus 'actual use' bill.
June 26th, 2016 at 10:59:26 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 107
Posts: 11127
Quote: Pacomartin

$94.52 Michigan
$91.90 District of Columbia
$91.26 California
$90.60 Wyoming
$88.78 Illinois
$87.14 Washington
$86.93 Montana
$83.91 Maine
$83.73 Colorado
$79.49 Utah
$77.79 New Mexico
t.


MI is near the bottom because it's been 7.5
cents per KWH for as long as I can remember.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
June 27th, 2016 at 7:21:36 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 706
Posts: 8142
Quote: Evenbob
MI is near the bottom because it's been 7.5 cents per KWH for as long as I can remember.


That is very low!. In Pennsylvania we are paying 7.45 cents per KWH for generation only, but includingdistribution it is roughly 12 cents per hour. We can shop generation companies, and if you want to pay more for wind or solar generation you have that right. Frankly that makes more sense to me than buying an electric vehicle.


Last summer we talked about states that use coal to generate electricity. The use of coal tends to keep prices down.

Quote: Pacomartin

2/3 OF THE ELECTRICITY GENERATED BY COAL WAS IN THE FOLLOWING 14 STATES
Texas
Indiana
Ohio - Democrat 2012
Illinois - Democrat 2012
Kentucky
Pennsylvania - Democrat 2012
Missouri
Michigan - Democrat 2012
West Virginia
Wyoming
Florida - Democrat 2012
Georgia
Alabama
Arizona

1% OF THE ELECTRICITY GENERATED BY COAL WAS IN THE FOLLOWING 12 STATES
Mississippi
Nevada
Hawaii
New York
New Jersey
Alaska
California
Massachusetts
Maine
New Hampshire
Washington
Connecticut

NONE OF THE ELECTRICITY GENERATED BY COAL IN THE FOLLOWING 6 STATES + DC
Rhode Island
South Dakota
Delaware
Idaho
Oregon
Vermont (none generated by natural gas either)
District of Columbia (none generated by natural gas either)
June 27th, 2016 at 12:24:34 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4578
Montana used to have even lower utility rates and it was a valuable stock to own, then the "sharks" sold the assets of the company to a Pennsylvania utility and kept the shareholders and state regulators in the dark sticking it to the Widows and Orphans but giving great commissions to Investment Bankers.
June 27th, 2016 at 1:02:10 PM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 719
The local Nevada Energy company that we pay our electric bill to is owned by Berkshire Hathaway. Should I be upset that I send my monthly payment to Warren Buffet or should I be happy because his money will be going to charities after his death?
June 27th, 2016 at 1:16:01 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 3122
Quote: DRich
We used about 3100 kwh this past month and it will probably be near double that this month because of the high temperatures.


Quote: Pacomartin
That's about 100 kwh per day. Nareed would go into shock if her usage passed 100 kWh in a day. We only went above 100 kWh for seven days last year in Pennsylvania (6 in the winter).

Sat, Jan 17, 15 118.5 kWh
Sun, Jan 18, 15 109.5 kWh
Thu, Jan 29, 15 127.3 kWh
Mon, Feb 9, 15 111.5 kWh
Fri, Feb 20, 15 107.5 kWh
Sat, Feb 21, 15 140.5 kWh

Mon, Jul 20, 15 127.8 kWh


Holy all of the expletives. You guys got industrial smelters at your houses?

All the talk made me actually look at my bills. This month has been my highest at 314kwh. I haven't had a bill reach $40 since... well, ever. Not even with the compressor and welder going all the time back in the spring, or the aquarium pumps on eternally.

My refusal to use a/c or lights, and the lack of TV... that can't account for it all, can it? O.o
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
June 27th, 2016 at 1:50:51 PM permalink
kenarman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 3
Posts: 841
Up in the frozen North here I average about 600 KWH / month. I have A/C in summer and 16 hours of darkness in the dead of winter so my usuage is the lowest in the spring and fall. Gas furnace which cost $55.00 month for the gas on a balanced payment plan.
"There is no sin but ignorance" Christopher Marlow
June 27th, 2016 at 1:58:34 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 49
Posts: 4578
Quote: Face
My refusal to use a/c or lights, and the lack of TV... that can't account for it all, can it? O.o
I have no idea about the dollars involved in those habits but we sure admire you for your lifestyle.