SCOTUS Vacancy

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September 19th, 2020 at 10:36:09 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 146
Posts: 25072
Quote: Dalex64

he Republicans need to do the right thing and not have a confirmation vote until the new terms start in January.


I don't see the difference. Trump does
it now or next year, what's the
difference. Biden isn't winning, he
has no enthusiastic base. It's worse
than the base Hillary had. He's an
even weaker candidate than she
was. His campaign is a joke, it's
like one long Monty Python sketch.

Also, the response from the Black
voters for Trump is incredible. As
well as Latinos. It's almost impossible
to beat an incumbent anyway, but
one as popular as Trump? Forget
about it.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
September 19th, 2020 at 11:19:55 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 190
Posts: 19117
Quote:
WASHINGTON—President Trump said Saturday that he will name a woman next week to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, signaling a contentious nomination fight during the final weeks of the presidential election.


One or more people went off on Biden limiting his vice pick to black women?

Well, I guess Trump just limited his judge pick to women. Got a problem with that? Just wondering.
You believe in an invisible god, and dismiss people who say they are trans? Really?
September 19th, 2020 at 11:26:32 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 190
Posts: 19117
Actually the right has been super loud and obnoxious about how identity politics shouldn't factor in a pick.. So they ought not to be quiet about it. Let's see if it matters.
You believe in an invisible god, and dismiss people who say they are trans? Really?
September 20th, 2020 at 2:01:17 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 1068
Posts: 12569
Andrew Jackson (7th POTUS and founder of the Democratic party) got to appoint the first Chief Justice since John Adams. and also 5 out of 7 of the associate justices (there was only 7 at the time, instead of 8). In those days retirement was not a taken as often and most justices died holding their position. Jackson's legacy was thus extended for a long time by both the number of justices and their combined 139 years of service.

Roger B. Taney (Died) 28 years, 198 days ---Chief Justice
James Moore Wayne (Died) 32 years, 172 days *
John McLean (Died) 31 years, 83 days
John Catron (Died) 28 years, 29 days *
Henry Baldwin (Died) 14 years, 94 days
Philip Pendleton Barbour (Died) 4 years, 289 days

* Two of these justices died during the Presidency of Republican Andrew Johnson, the unlikely heir to the office when Lincoln was shot. John Catron died May 30, 1865 (45 days after Lincoln) and James Moore Wayne died July 5, 1867.

Rather than let Johnson appoint new justices, the Democrats simply abolished the seats. The decision to end Catron's seat was less controversial since Abraham Lincoln had added a 10th Supreme court seat in the middle of the Civil War. However, the decision to end Wayne's seat was pure politics. A 9th seat was restored during the term of Ulysses S Grant.
September 20th, 2020 at 4:19:50 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 135
Posts: 18404
Quote: rxwine
One or more people went off on Biden limiting his vice pick to black women?

Well, I guess Trump just limited his judge pick to women. Got a problem with that? Just wondering.


Trump previously put his potential picks out there. What is the surprise?

But yes, Bides was racist and sexist in limiting his pick.
The President is a fink.
September 20th, 2020 at 6:02:10 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 1068
Posts: 12569
The U.S. treasurer is a much more ceremonial job than the powerful position of treasury secretary. The Secretary of the Treasury position is now occupied by Steven T. Mnuchin, the 77th "middle aged white guy" to have the position. Jack Lew, Obama’s Treasury secretary, is the highest-ranking Orthodox Jew in U.S. government history.


The idea of giving certain position to minority groups go back a long way. While in 1949 having a white woman in a powerful government position was unique, over the decades the position has been given to a black woman, and now exclusively to Latinas.


https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/08/why-all-of-the-us-treasurers-since-1949-have-been-women/376004/

For the last six decades, presidents have treated the position as a low-risk, high-visibility job that promotes the appearance of diversity while rewarding loyal supporters.

President Harry S. Truman started the tradition in 1949 when he appointed Georgia Neese Clark, who campaigned for the Democrats in her Republican home state of Kansas. (The position of treasurer has existed since 1775.) By naming Clark as treasurer, Truman rewarded her loyalty and acknowledged the Democrats’ debt to the votes of women, who had joined the workforce in droves by the end of World War II. The job, like many ambassador positions, has continued to go to women with a history of political activism.

So why did a streak of female treasurers continue uninterrupted after Truman appointed Clark?

“Once there’s a woman appointed in a position, it’s easy to assume that position is one that could be filled by a woman,” says Jennifer Lawless, who directs the Women and Politics Institute at American University. “Once an initial ceiling is broken, once an initial piece of progress is made, there is a tendency to continue down that path.”

Such is the power of precedent. Once Clark proved herself capable of excelling at a certain position, future presidents felt less inclined to return to the way things used to be, Lawless said.

Of course, the U.S. treasurer is a much more ceremonial job than the powerful position of treasury secretary—a role that has only ever been held by (white) men, currently by Jack Lew (of meme-worthy signature fame). The current treasurer Rosa Gumataotao Rios, the sixth Latina ever to hold the job, advises top Treasury and finance officials and directly oversees the U.S. Mint and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. But Rios cannot create policy the way Lew or Yellen can, nor is her job as crucial to the functioning of the administration as theirs is. Ever since a woman was first appointed, the treasurer position has seen long stretches of vacancies—totaling 3,359 days, or nine years.

If this suggests a historical pattern of tokenism, Rios, who previously served as a managing director of investments for a $22 billion investment-management firm, rejects the relevance of any such pattern to her appointment. And in a statement to The Atlantic, the Department of Treasury emphasized the scope of Rios’s job: “While the role of the Treasurer of the United States has evolved over time, today the Treasurer of the United States oversees two major components of the Department of Treasury—the U.S. Mint and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. This includes managing 4,000 employees and a currency and a coin portfolio with a $4.5 billion budget. The Treasurer is also a senior advisor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Treasury on a wide variety of issues, including community development.”*

Still, according to Alice Eagly, a social psychologist at Northwestern University who studies women and leadership, part of the decision to choose women and minorities for the treasurer position can boil down to “optics.” Eagly notes that it’s easier for presidents to actively engineer diversity with less-scrutinized positions like treasurer, compared with, say, Yellen’s job (for which Yellen wasn’t even the first pick).

But the overall picture becomes more nuanced when you consider that, in addition to their official duties, treasurers also work as ambassadors for economic development in lower-income or under-served communities where the Treasury wants to foster growth. Viewed in this light, “optics” is not a trivial thing, according to Heidi Hartmann, an economist and the founder of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Marginalized communities, Hartmann says, tend to be deeply suspicious of the government’s financial institutions. (Also part of the Treasury? The IRS.)


So the administration and under-served communities both benefit from the treasurer having a minority as a figurehead. President George W. Bush’s appointee, Anna Escobedo Cabral helped displaced victims of Hurricane Katrina who lost access to federal benefit payments and their bank accounts after the storm. Combine Cabral’s profile as a Mexican-American with her working-class upbringing, and she becomes instantly relatable as a spokesperson promoting financial literacy.

While treasurers have limited fiscal power, then, they can still matter. Figurehead political positions, held by men and women, are common, and it’s not uncommon to see these positions leveraged to great effect. As Lawless points out: “The average American doesn’t know the difference between Janet Yellen’s position and treasurer.” In an oddly serendipitous way, this sort of general ignorance can work to the advantage of women seeking economic positions in the future. “If American people see women in positions of economic power, it can help change the perception that women are not qualified for those kinds of jobs,” Lawless says.

“Women ... need these positions that are kind of earmarked for them,” says Hartmann, until broader diversity becomes the rule, not the exception.
September 20th, 2020 at 6:11:07 AM permalink
Dalex64
Member since: Mar 8, 2014
Threads: 3
Posts: 3687
Quote: Evenbob
I don't see the difference. Trump does
it now or next year, what's the
difference. Biden isn't winning, he
has no enthusiastic base. It's worse
than the base Hillary had. He's an
even weaker candidate than she
was. His campaign is a joke, it's
like one long Monty Python sketch.

Also, the response from the Black
voters for Trump is incredible. As
well as Latinos. It's almost impossible
to beat an incumbent anyway, but
one as popular as Trump? Forget
about it.


If trump wins, then the difference is who is elected to the senate to vote for confirmation.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." Daniel Patrick Moynihan
September 20th, 2020 at 11:31:38 AM permalink
JCW09
Member since: Aug 27, 2018
Threads: 12
Posts: 847
Trump nominates Amy Barrett next week.
Senate background investigation & document accumulation begins immediately.
Cocaine Mitch will begin the hearings before The Election.
The SCOTUS just became "The Issue" for the last 6 weeks of the election.
So much for getting more mileage out of the handling of the "Covid Pandemic"
But Mitch won't move forward on a vote until after the election in the Lame Duck Session.
If Trump wins, Mitch will get the 51 votes necessary to confirm.
If Trump loses, Mitch will get the 51 votes necessary to confirm.
The November Presidential outcome won't be a difference maker in the confirmation outcome.
Elections have consequences and the Dems didn't win back the Senate in 2018.
Def. of Liar - "A Person Who Tells Lies" / "I lied. Deal with it" - ams288
September 20th, 2020 at 11:32:55 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 135
Posts: 18404
Quote: JCW09
Trump nominates Amy Barrett next week.
Senate background investigation & document accumulation begins immediately.
Cocaine Mitch will begin the hearings before The Election.
The SCOTUS just became "The Issue" for the last 6 weeks of the election.
So much for getting more mileage out of the handling of the "Covid Pandemic"
But Mitch won't move forward on a vote until after the election in the Lame Duck Session.
If Trump wins, Mitch will get the 51 votes necessary to confirm.
If Trump loses, Mitch will get the 51 votes necessary to confirm.
The November Presidential outcome won't be a difference maker in the confirmation outcome.
Elections have consequences and the Dems didn't win back the Senate in 2018.


So you are saying all Trump will do is what the Democrats would have done in his position?
The President is a fink.
September 20th, 2020 at 11:56:49 AM permalink
ams288
Member since: Apr 21, 2016
Threads: 29
Posts: 12748
Could the House impeach Donny again (or maybe that corrupt POS Bill Barr) to tie up the Senate for a while?
“A straight man will not go for kids.” - AZDuffman
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