Do it yourself

March 16th, 2015 at 6:58:38 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 328
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Quote: Face
As to why it goes crooked, that typically points to a cross threading situation. However, since most of that stuff is plastic and the threads quite robust, that seems unlikely.


The pipe is metal and the shower head plastic.

I'll go on standard MO: try the tape, then call the plumber if that doesn't work.

Thanks for the help.

Quote:
Why you so rough on shower equipment? Shower / karate dojo? ;)


Me?

I've an awful mineral buildup all over. The shower simply had no pressure left; it was more like a drizzle. I took it down to clean the gunk out, then it didn't go back in as it should have. A spare I had simply won't screw in.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
March 16th, 2015 at 7:28:50 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 119
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The different thread size reminds me of the stupid ass sink stoppers we have in the kitchen that replaced the old ones.

I plunged the drain several times before I figured out these things were slightly undersized compared to the old ones. So, when seated properly they still keep the water from flowing fast enough. The mechanism is suppose to offer a twist and stop and twist and filter out large objects.

Anyway, instead of taking them back, I found they work if leaned slightly sideways, so fixed, sorta.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
March 16th, 2015 at 8:08:17 PM permalink
Face
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Quote: Nareed
The pipe is metal and the shower head plastic.

I'll go on standard MO: try the tape, then call the plumber if that doesn't work.

Thanks for the help.


Ah yes. Metal to plastic is very easy to cross thread, especially if the threads are fine. Still, that tape should do the trick, cross thread or no. If it doesn't work, pull it apart and add even more tape. It really is deceptively thin. I used it on my air compressor and my initial installation saw me pulling apart about 7 times as I kept underestimating how much tape I needed =p

Quote: Nareed
I've an awful mineral buildup all over. The shower simply had no pressure left; it was more like a drizzle. I took it down to clean the gunk out, then it didn't go back in as it should have. A spare I had simply won't screw in.


As for the buildup, I know I mentioned CLR before.



Maybe I should have continued, as you don't need to disassemble anything to use it. Take the CLR (or even vinegar) and pour it into a ziplock bag. Pull the ziplock bag over the head (while it's still attached) and either seal it or tape it in place so that the head soaks in it. Leave overnight. That's literally all it takes. As it's a chemical reaction, it requires no scrubbing =)

Or, even better (IMO), is to get a head where the nozzles are rubber, like this...



Rubber is soft. Minerals are brittle. If you ever get build up, just rub the nozzle. The nozzle flexes and the crust breaks up and falls right off. I, too, have terribly hard water and tons of calcium buildup. But I have rubber nozzles. Cleaning my head takes my right thumb and about 6 seconds. Rub it and I'm done =D
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March 16th, 2015 at 8:42:15 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Face
Or, even better (IMO), is to get a head where the nozzles are rubber, like this...


Actually they are rubber. I also do rub them now and then. But the mineral gunk also builds up higher up on the shower head. When that happens I have to unscrew it and clean it. I've tried CLR before, but it doesn't clear everything out.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
March 16th, 2015 at 8:54:22 PM permalink
Face
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Quote: Nareed

Actually they are rubber. I also do rub them now and then. But the mineral gunk also builds up higher up on the shower head. When that happens I have to unscrew it and clean it. I've tried CLR before, but it doesn't clear everything out.


Huh. I don't have that problem on my shower head, or at least not to the point that I find it bothersome (though I can guarantee that you and I have a very different opinions on acceptable housecleaning standards ;)).

But in my aquariums, it is absolutely murder. I do use CLR and it fizzes like crazy, but with soaking or even submerging overnight, it still takes literally hours of scrubbing with a rough sponge or dish cloth to improve it. And I do mean hours. And I still don't get it all.

Short of using highly acidic concrete cleaner (which would likely eat the plating off the shower head), I've no further advice. Not unless you want to spend $X,000 on a water purifying system =/

Oh! One bit of advice. When you're done showering, wipe it down with a dry cloth. The minerals are dissolved in the water. No water, no mineral buildup. Yay! More chores! =p
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
March 17th, 2015 at 7:24:11 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Face
(though I can guarantee that you and I have a very different opinions on acceptable housecleaning standards ;)).


(You should see my bedroom someday <sigh> One of these days I will clean out the closet).

Quote:
But in my aquariums, it is absolutely murder. I do use CLR and it fizzes like crazy,


Isn't that hard on the fish? ;)


Quote:
Oh! One bit of advice. When you're done showering, wipe it down with a dry cloth. The minerals are dissolved in the water. No water, no mineral buildup. Yay! More chores! =p


I'll try that. Thanks.

I'll get you for that, too ;)
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
March 28th, 2015 at 10:57:38 AM permalink
Face
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How much weight can you put on a modern home's floor before you have to worry about falling through it?

I'm designing an aquarium, right? Using what I got now, the footprint will be some 8' x 2', which gives me a relatively large area to spread the weight around. Due to the size and necessary bracing, I figure the whole contraption itself would be a few hundred lbs. No big deal. While I don't really know how heavy the acrylic portion would be, I think saying "400lbs" would be a reasonable estimate leaning towards the high side.

The issue is the water. Based on the dimensions I have drawn up, the water alone is a cup shy of 4,000lbs =/

Due to the size and orientation of the tank vs the construction of the house, it'll only be "on" two of the floor joists, which, I believe, are 2" x 6"'s.

Is that too much? I obviously don't want to do this ignorantly, as a 16 square foot hole in the floor would only be the start of my troubles (500gal of water would do a lot of damage =p). It seems like a #%$^ton of weight, but then again, I've seen cars and trucks smash through houses and their weight was only spread over four relatively tiny wheels and they never went through the floor.

Whatcha think?
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March 28th, 2015 at 12:27:43 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 119
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I don't know, but I believe King size waterbeds were up to 2000lbs.

Being that's twice the weight and smaller square footage, it doesn't instill confidence.

Directly on support beams is much better than not in this case.

Large truck in a house is a good point though. But you usually don't park them there that long.

What would be normal for a room is the weight of furniture, and full of people, like at a party. What do you think that would weigh?
No one has ever proven I am not God.
March 28th, 2015 at 1:04:52 PM permalink
Face
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Quote: rxwine
I don't know, but I believe King size waterbeds were up to 2000lbs.


Bah. Can't believe I didn't think of that =p

Quote: rxwine
What would be normal for a room is the weight of furniture, and full of people, like at a party. What do you think that would weigh


Most I ever had, back in my party days, would've been about 3,000lbs of meat, assuming an average of 150lbs a person. Add the furniture and we're still not up to the weight of my water alone, and we were spread all over the room =/
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March 28th, 2015 at 1:22:34 PM permalink
Face
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Jesus Christ ><

I of course reached out to my idiot friends on Facebook. I of course got answers like "about tree fiddy". So to Google I went.

Interesting stuff. Found an article from a structural engineer tackling this exact problem. Pretty much told me everything I needed to know.

Apparently residential floors are made to withstand at least 40lbs per square foot of pressure. That was initially frightening as even my "small" aquarium was over 80 (my planned aquarium is 280+!!). But I guess since the joists are connected by bracing and the subfloor, you can somewhat use the entire room's space in your calculation, not just the specific area it lies on. *Phew*. That does lower my project into the 28lb p/sq" mark, but it's still not good enough since it is stuck into one small area.

Looks like I've more work to do, as my planned location is out unless I A) insert load bearing poles in the basement (not an option as they'd be right in the middle of the den), or B) remove the drop tile ceiling and add a number of additional support joists (a project I don't intend to take on unless I have to =p).

I've now got to check the load bearing wall instead, and draw up a new design to go there. Perhaps said wall is constructed so as to require little to no house remodeling. Or maybe I could cut a foot off the planned height of the tank, thereby dropping the weight a full 1,000lbs.

Face Inc. "Biting off more than he can chew since 1980" =p
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.