Spanish Word of the Day

November 5th, 2012 at 3:13:47 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 744
Posts: 8748
Quote: Wizard
Thanks for your advice. Indeed, I am concerned that the normal Camino de Santiago is too crowded and trendy. Another one I'm think of doing, at least the Spain part, is the E4.


The distance from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostella through León is about 800 km.
The GR 7 is a long-distance footpath in Spain. It is part of the network of Senderos de Gran Recorrido, and forms the westernmost part of the European walking route E4 which runs from Spain to Greece. The GR 7 is 1900 km long.

I assume you are talking about just a part of it, as it is over twice as long as the Camino.

I always assumed that 50 km per day would be reasonable. Combined with a setup day, 2 tourist days and two travel days would make the trip about 3 weeks.

Many guides suggest walking between 23 and 27 kilometers per day. I would theoretically believe I could train to do better than that,

Did you have a different pacing in mind? From your description of Mt Whitney it sounds as if you are capable of a lot.
November 5th, 2012 at 4:54:02 AM permalink
FrGamble
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 5208
Quote: Wizard
This is somewhat (okay, very) off topic, but I have a question for FrG. I just saw the movie The Way. As an avid hiker, of course, I'm now inspired to do Camino de Santiago myself. That Wiki page says that the credencial, used to gain lodging along the way, can be obtained via a chuch. As the movie shows, as you stay at each posada, as you go, they stamp it.

So, Padre, does your own church give these out? It would mean a lot to me to get one directly from you to take along my journey.


Dear Wizard, I think you would love the Camino, I did a very short version of it during my studies in Rome. Don't be scared off because it is popular, that is because it is awesome for everybody. I have a call in to the Archdiocese to see if I might be able to personally make you a "Pilgrim's passport", but I want to make sure it will be acceptable to everyone officially during your camino.

yo gusto la biblioteca!
November 5th, 2012 at 6:00:44 AM permalink
Wizard
Administrator
Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 148
Posts: 3227
Quote: Pacomartin
The distance from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostella through León is about 800 km. The GR 7 is a long-distance footpath in Spain. It is part of the network of Senderos de Gran Recorrido, and forms the westernmost part of the European walking route E4 which runs from Spain to Greece. The GR 7 is 1900 km long.


I would like do something in Spain about 500 KM. It doesn't need to be the full thing. If I want to do the Camino Santiago, but at a time of year when it isn't too crowded, do you have any advice?

Quote:
Many guides suggest walking between 23 and 27 kilometers per day. I would theoretically believe I could train to do better than that,


I've done about 200 miles of the Appalachian Trail (but not all at once). I know the through-hikers on that tend to do 15 to 20 miles per day. However, I think they are in better shape than the average Camino hiker. They also evidently carry a lot more gear, as it is not nearly as well-supported as the Camino Santiago. That said, I think I would do 18-20 miles per day, or 29-32 kilometers. I won't be my goal to set any speed records, but also enjoy myself along the way. I see a lot of red wine and good food consumed along the way.

Quote: FrGamble
Dear Wizard, I think you would love the Camino, I did a very short version of it during my studies in Rome. Don't be scared off because it is popular, that is because it is awesome for everybody. I have a call in to the Archdiocese to see if I might be able to personally make you a "Pilgrim's passport", but I want to make sure it will be acceptable to everyone officially during your camino.


Thanks Father! I would be very proud to carry around a passport you made yourself. Hopefully someday soon I can show it to you covered in stamps and tell you stories from it.

Quote:
yo gusto la biblioteca!


Gustar is a special verb that is conjugated based on what you like, not who is doing the liking. So, in the present tense, it is only going to be gusta o gustan, depending if you like one thing or more than one. Since you are the one the library is appealing to, you would say Me gusta la biblioteca. I don't like it either. The language would make more sense if it worked as you said it.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 5th, 2012 at 8:08:39 AM permalink
Wizard
Administrator
Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 148
Posts: 3227
Fecha: 5-11-12
Palabra: Clausurar


Today's SWD means to gether together or close/conclude.

You may be wondering how it differs from cerrar. Cerrar is the usual word for "close" as in to close a door. I think clausurar refers to something coming to an ending. Kind of like Romney's campaign.

Ejemplo time.

No ha clausurado hasta que la señora gorda canta. = It isn't over until the fat lady sings.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 5th, 2012 at 9:20:13 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 330
Posts: 11589
Quote: Wizard
You may be wondering how it differs from cerrar. Cerrar is the usual word for "close" as in to close a door. I think clausurar refers to something coming to an ending. Kind of like Romney's campaign.


It means to close something for good, or by force. For example, the close of a season in sports can be called "clausura de la temporada." If your business is shut down by the government, they put up a sticker on the door saying "Clausurado." The second usage is by far the most common. If you close down your business for reasons of your own, you'd say "cerré el negocio," or something like that.

Quote:
No ha clausurado hasta que la señora gorda canta. = It isn't over until the fat lady sings.


That's bad usage. One local sportscaster does like to say "Esto no termina hasta que cante la gorda."
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
November 5th, 2012 at 11:44:01 AM permalink
Wizard
Administrator
Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 148
Posts: 3227
Quote: Nareed
That's bad usage. One local sportscaster does like to say "Esto no termina hasta que cante la gorda."


Thanks. For the benefit of others, the sportscaster was using the subjunctive.

In other news, Nareed's translation of my sports betting page is up.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 5th, 2012 at 4:14:38 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 330
Posts: 11589
Quote: Wizard
Thanks. For the benefit of others, the sportscaster was using the subjunctive.


I was? Huh, how about that?

It's still better than the early-game crew who like to say "Esto no se acaba hasta que se acaba." Tautology only gets you so far...
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
November 5th, 2012 at 6:45:42 PM permalink
Wizard
Administrator
Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 148
Posts: 3227
Fecha: 6-11-12
Palabra: Correa


Today's SWD means strap/leash.

The question for the advanced readers is whether it shares the same etymology as correr (to run -- as in to run a marathon).

Ejemplo time.

Me gusta bolsos que tienen correas se ven como cadenas. = I like purses that have straps that look like chains.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 6th, 2012 at 6:45:05 AM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 330
Posts: 11589
Quote: Wizard
Me gusta bolsos que tienen correas se ven como cadenas. = I like purses that have straps that look like chains.


While "bolsO" is technically correct for purse, I've ever found it outside of books (literally!). In any case, you're using the singular "gusta" with the plural "bolsAs," and you're missing an article So:

Me gustaN LAS bolsAs que tienen correas que se ven como cadenas.
If Trump where half as smart as he thinks he is, he'd be twice as smart as he really is.
November 6th, 2012 at 10:39:46 AM permalink
Wizard
Administrator
Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 148
Posts: 3227
Quote: Nareed
Me gustaN LAS bolsAs que tienen correas que se ven como cadenas.


Gads! I owe 20 push ups for that. Especially embarassing after just having corrected FrG on his incorrect usage of gustar.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber