The Discomfort Thread

May 7th, 2015 at 5:57:37 PM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 71
Posts: 1509
Thanks all, makes me feel better talking about it. About 5 ounces of bourbon tonight is all. Pain is gone again. Amazing.

Quote: Face
Next time you bark a shin


I used to have a buddy who would point out that such a thing would "feel good once it stopped hurting". He was talking about the endorphin thing, google it if you need to. Barked shins do great creating those.

I think it is one of the problems about back pain, no matter how bad it is, the endorphins don't seem to kick in.

What the hell am I rambling about? Oh, the bourbon, sorry, will sign out now.
Mustard:You like Kipling, Miss Scarlet? Sure, I'll eat anything [from movie]
May 7th, 2015 at 6:18:21 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4308
Quote: rxwine
Oh, another thing, the standard wheelbarrow has one wheel. Excellent way to hurt your back is having one of those loaded heavily and have it tip too far to the side and try to correct as you twist sideways. I hurt just thinking about it.
Yes, that is what I was thinking about... there might be a type of injury known to occur if one loses control over a wheelbarrow and grabs to keep it under control.

Lots in the medical literature under wheel chair but nothing under wheel barrow. Perhaps OSHA records?
May 7th, 2015 at 11:01:45 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 12
Posts: 1773
Quote: rxwine
Ya'll ever try one these

You chronic pain guys must of considered it.


I have seen some infrared, haven't tried that. I will keep my eyes out for more info on it.
Everyone gets thrown from the plane to maintain altitude
May 8th, 2015 at 4:51:35 AM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4308
I'd be unlikely to trust something from Hammercher Schlemmer but its a device that was invented to aid expensive race horses not people and therefore is more likely to work. The White LED light is even better for treating infections. Even better than the very strong mouthwash for incoming patients is the use of a white led light in the mouth, even for really bad cases of oral mucositis from a patient taking so many chemo therapy pills by mouth. Certainly effective against gingivitis and peridontal problems that cause a lot of pathogens to make it to the lungs or blood stream. Only three weeks ago was a billing code developed for this treatment by the Oncology Nurses Association.

I used an early quartz halogen lamp to banish athletes foot when I was a young teen.

At a time when most of the patients were race horses I had opted to do a paper on the efficacy of the device but I lost interest in it and just didn't bother with it mainly due to depression.
May 9th, 2015 at 4:45:23 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 3087
Quote: petroglyph
I wish I didn't know.

Here's one a friend taught me. If you don't have a rubber band and need a quick fix [albeit pretty short lived] reach up there and jerk out some nose hairs.

Also helps when stiff arming won't keep you awake at the wheel. : ) You can get 5 minutes out of it pretty easy.


That's how I "trim" nose hairs. I just pull them out. On a scale of 1-10, I'd rate that particular pain at about a 0.8. It just doesn't do it for me.

Quote: odiousgambit

I used to have a buddy who would point out that such a thing would "feel good once it stopped hurting". He was talking about the endorphin thing, google it if you need to. Barked shins do great creating those.

I think it is one of the problems about back pain, no matter how bad it is, the endorphins don't seem to kick in.

What the hell am I rambling about? Oh, the bourbon, sorry, will sign out now.


You're not rambling. Endorphins are real, and they work. Why do you think I do the things I do? Why would I go blast 30' doubles or play 7 games of hockey in one weekend when I hurt the way I do? It's precisely because of that. Whether it's adrenaline or the "runner's high" or just hurting something else bad enough to reach pain overload, they're the only times I ever get actual relief. Sure, my legs burn and my hips are on fire and that slash I took under the chin didn't exactly tickle. But my back doesn't hurt.
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
May 9th, 2015 at 4:58:52 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 61
Posts: 3087
Bug bites. I got about a thousand today and I know how to fix them. Easy peasy.

When one of those blood sucking bastards bites you, it injects its saliva which contains an anti coagulant to keep the blood flowing so it can feed. The proteins in this are recognized by your body as an invader, so it sends out histamines to go take care of it. As the histamines flood the area, the area swells. That's what causes the "bump". And swelling stimulates nerve endings, and that's what makes it itch.

You could just apply ice. Ice reduces swelling and also numbs nerves, so that'll take care of it temporarily. You could also take antihistamines, but that's also temporary and might make you drowsy. Want to rid the itch? Start at the source.

Any time I get bit, I wait a bit. It usually takes about 15 minutes for the bump to appear. Once it does, apply pressure on each side of it as if you were popping a zit. You don't have to pinch the hell out of it, just squeeze firmly until you see a drop of liquid form where the bite hole is. If you had to wait some hours after the bite to get to the squeezing, itch it a bit to make sure you've scratched off the scab and can allow the juice to escape. Squeeze and let it bead up. Once it does, wipe it away and squeeze from the other angle. Let it bead up, wipe it away, and do it again.

Should only have to do it 2 -4 times. It'll stop beading when you're done. Once you do that, you've removed a bunch of the stuff that caused the reaction to begin with. Plus, the act of squeezing will have overloaded nerve endings, making them temporarily numb. By the time they recover and are ready to transmit the slightest tickle again, the histamine reaction will have mostly passed as there is nothing left there to react with.

It's especially useful when you get one of those maddening ones like on a knuckle or an elbow. But it works literally 100% of the time, no matter where you get bit. I can't even think of a bug it doesn't work for, outside of bees. Those hurt so damn much I don't touch them, and I always found their itch mild enough to ignore.

Try it. You'll see. And you're welcome =)
Be bold and risk defeat, or be cautious and encourage it.
May 9th, 2015 at 6:16:56 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4308
Please folks adrenaline ain't been called adrenaline in eons, its epinephrine.
May 9th, 2015 at 7:03:19 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 115
Posts: 4729
Quote: Fleastiff
Please folks adrenaline ain't been called adrenaline in eons, its epinephrine.


Hope you don't insist we stop using Novacaine finally.
No one has ever proven I am not God.
May 9th, 2015 at 7:11:44 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 12
Posts: 1773
Quote: Face
That's how I "trim" nose hairs. I just pull them out. On a scale of 1-10, I'd rate that particular pain at about a 0.8.
It was more of a joke. I actually use an electric trimmer, for some reason it seems nose hair is the fastest growing hair on my body.

I have never pulled one to alleviate pain or to keep me awake.
Everyone gets thrown from the plane to maintain altitude
May 9th, 2015 at 8:48:36 PM permalink
Fleastiff
Member since: Oct 27, 2012
Threads: 48
Posts: 4308
Allergic response to dust mites? Good. Don't try fooling around with remedies. The detritus of dust mites has the same molecular shape as the venom of a scorpion and you have an innate response to scorpion venom, if you are lucky. So just kill the little buggers.