What Movies Have You Seen Lately?

July 30th, 2021 at 10:35:00 AM permalink
Mission146
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 18
Posts: 2374
Quote: zippyboy
Bob hates anything that's not Lala Land, Downton Abbey or Gunsmoke.


It's tough for us Downton Abbey fans to think positively of other programming. The dialogue is simply that good. Most other TV shows would do just as well to be silent, when compared.
"War is the remedy that our enemies have chosen..let us give them all they want." William T. Sherman
July 30th, 2021 at 12:07:40 PM permalink
Evenbob
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 141
Posts: 23521
Quote: Mission146
It's tough for us Downton Abbey fans to think positively of other programming. The dialogue is simply that good. Most other TV shows would do just as well to be silent, when compared.


I have seen the entire series 14 times and it's been about 4 months and I'm hankering to start watching again. To think the whole thing was written by one man is mind-boggling.
If you take a risk, you may lose. If you never take a risk, you will always lose.
July 31st, 2021 at 7:56:05 AM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 38
Posts: 2940
Quote: Evenbob
Absolutely untrue. I hate any movie that has horrible acting and a stupid story. Gunsmoke? I have not seen an episode of Gunsmoke since the late sixties. The problem is most people don't know bad acting if it's staring them in the face. Just like most people don't know crappy food when they eat it.


To me bad food is easy to define. Almost anything with vegetables is bad food. Meat is good food.
We are all going to die, why procrastinate?
July 31st, 2021 at 8:33:54 AM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 153
Posts: 12681
Quote: DRich
To me bad food is easy to define. Almost anything with vegetables is bad food. Meat is good food.


Your heart must have a lot of marbling.
In the beginning, God created a video game we call The Universe
July 31st, 2021 at 8:39:57 AM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 38
Posts: 2940
Quote: rxwine
Your heart must have a lot of marbling.


i'm sure it does. i am shocked and confused every morning when i wake up.
We are all going to die, why procrastinate?
August 11th, 2021 at 7:55:56 PM permalink
Gandler
Member since: Aug 15, 2019
Threads: 20
Posts: 2654
I watched 1917 last night. Excellent movie, one continuous shot (or maybe two). There are a shortage of WWI movies, and this was really well done.
(Two British soldiers have to deliver a message to a forward trench in a short period of time, and the movie follows their journey).

August 11th, 2021 at 8:07:55 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 153
Posts: 12681
Did you see this?

Quote:
All Quiet on the Western Front opened to wide acclaim in the United States. Considered a realistic and harrowing account of warfare in World War I, it made the American Film Institute's first 100 Years...100 Movies list in 1997. A decade later, after the same organization polled over 1,501 workers in the creative community, All Quiet on the Western Front was ranked the seventh-best American epic film.[6][7] In 1991, the film was selected and preserved by the United States Library of Congress' National Film Registry as being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[8][9] The film was the first to win the Academy Awards for both Outstanding Production and Best Director.


I seem to remember there's some good foreign films on 1, but can't specifically recall what I saw.
In the beginning, God created a video game we call The Universe
August 11th, 2021 at 9:41:48 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 1027
Posts: 12055
Quote: rxwine
Did you see this? All Quiet on the Western Front opened to wide acclaim in the United States.


All Quiet on the Western Front, was among the books banned and burned in Nazi Germany. All Quiet on the Western Front sold 2.5 million copies in 22 languages in its first 18 months in print. In 1930, the book was adapted as an Academy Award-winning film.

With that pedigree you would think I would enjoy it more, but the film was released only 2.5 years after the first "talkie", the Jazz Singer. So the production values are very antiquated. Also the anti-war sentiment was shocking when the book was published in 1928, but those sentiments are very common today.

The Hayes Code" was adopted in 1930, but oversight was poor, and it did not become rigorously enforced until July 1, 1934. So movies released before that date are often called pre-code. Possibly the most charming pre-code film was released with just 19 weeks remaining in the pre-code era is "It Happened One Night"; a romantic comedy film with elements of screwball comedy directed and co-produced by Frank Capra in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her father's thumb and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable). It's still very watchable over 87 years later.
August 12th, 2021 at 7:08:52 AM permalink
Gandler
Member since: Aug 15, 2019
Threads: 20
Posts: 2654
Quote: rxwine
Did you see this?

Quote:
All Quiet on the Western Front opened to wide acclaim in the United States. Considered a realistic and harrowing account of warfare in World War I, it made the American Film Institute's first 100 Years...100 Movies list in 1997. A decade later, after the same organization polled over 1,501 workers in the creative community, All Quiet on the Western Front was ranked the seventh-best American epic film.[6][7] In 1991, the film was selected and preserved by the United States Library of Congress' National Film Registry as being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[8][9] The film was the first to win the Academy Awards for both Outstanding Production and Best Director.


I seem to remember there's some good foreign films on 1, but can't specifically recall what I saw.


That is a great movie (and excellent book). I think I read the book in High School and have seen both versions of the movie (the 1930s one and the 1970s one), both were very good, though in some ways the one in the 1930s was more interesting as it was released right as WWII was basically heating up. I remember liking the older version a lot more.

I think you are correct about a lot more foreign films (especially because even most of the English movies about WWI are actually British made).

This list is interesting:
https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/guide/all-world-war-1-movies-ranked-by-tomatometer/

It seems a large batch came out in the period between WWI and WWII.

Lawrence of Arabia is of course a classic, but its one of those movies I don't automatically lump into WWI movies as the setting and plot is so different than most (I do love that movie, I do not mean that in a negative way).

"Paths of Glory" (Kubrick), is another one that looks good, and I want to watch (its one of those movies that has been on my list to watch eventually for a while), but never have (I have never seen a bad movie by him).

But, even that list of all movies in the world is not very large. I suspect WWI occurred right as movies started to become possible to make (or not long after), however as movies with sound became affordable and possible WWII started not long after which was on the minds of a lot of people (and effected many more), so during and after that probably received much more focus. Also, America's involvement in WWI was far less than in WWII, so many Americans probably did not feel as much of a connection to inspire Hollywood movies to the same extent of WWII.
August 12th, 2021 at 7:13:41 AM permalink
Gandler
Member since: Aug 15, 2019
Threads: 20
Posts: 2654
Quote: Pacomartin
All Quiet on the Western Front, was among the books banned and burned in Nazi Germany. All Quiet on the Western Front sold 2.5 million copies in 22 languages in its first 18 months in print. In 1930, the book was adapted as an Academy Award-winning film.

With that pedigree you would think I would enjoy it more, but the film was released only 2.5 years after the first "talkie", the Jazz Singer. So the production values are very antiquated. Also the anti-war sentiment was shocking when the book was published in 1928, but those sentiments are very common today.

The Hayes Code" was adopted in 1930, but oversight was poor, and it did not become rigorously enforced until July 1, 1934. So movies released before that date are often called pre-code. Possibly the most charming pre-code film was released with just 19 weeks remaining in the pre-code era is "It Happened One Night"; a romantic comedy film with elements of screwball comedy directed and co-produced by Frank Capra in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her father's thumb and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable). It's still very watchable over 87 years later.


My grandmother was obsessed with It Happened One Night (and I think Clark Gable in general). I have seen it several times, it is certainly watchable (even as a young kid I never found it boring), but not a movie I would probably return to on my own. That is interesting though, I did not realize that was one of the last releases.