Spanish Word of the Day

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December 27th, 2017 at 11:59:17 AM permalink
kenarman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 7
Posts: 1207
There is a famous quote that I can't remember who said it about oysters. "It was a brave man who first ate an oyster"
"but if you make yourselves sheep, the wolves will eat you." Benjamin Franklin
December 27th, 2017 at 12:48:27 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12529
Quote: Pacomartin
I seem to remember eating oysters that looked like that in Mazatlan


Do you recall any illness later on?
Fresh out of clues. Did you really expect anything?
December 27th, 2017 at 12:49:46 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12529
Quote: Wizard
I went to a wedding and they flew in some famous oyster chef from Seattle.


I have a great two step recipe for oysters:

1) Leave them in the ocean.

2) You're done.
Fresh out of clues. Did you really expect anything?
December 28th, 2017 at 12:13:18 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 807
Posts: 9715
Quote: Nareed
Do you recall any illness later on?

I remember my friend getting very ill in Mexico City after eating fish. We had to call a doctor.
January 24th, 2018 at 10:52:42 AM permalink
Wizard
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Member since: Oct 23, 2012
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I was wondering whether god should be addressed as tú or Ud. in Spanish. From a Christian perspective, I could see an argument being made both ways. Bible verses could be cherry picked to show god as an angry wrathful god who will strike you down for a long list of things such as gathering sticks on the Sabbath. Others could be picked to show god as your invisible best friend who sees to your every (true) need. I tried to think of a bible passage where god is addressed as "you" in English and recalled Psalm 23, which I believe is also well known in Judaism (I went to temple once and could tell it was being said in Hebrew by the tempo of it). Here it is:

Quote: Psalm 23
El Señor es mi pastor,
Nada me faltará.
En lugares de verdes pastos me hace descansar;
Junto a aguas de reposo me conduce.
El restaura mi alma;
Me guía por senderos de justicia
Por amor de Su nombre.
Aunque pase por el valle de sombra de muerte,
No temeré mal alguno, porque Tú estás conmigo;
Tu vara y Tu cayado me infunden aliento.
preparas mesa delante de mí en presencia de mis enemigos;
Has ungido mi cabeza con aceite;
Mi copa está rebosando.
Ciertamente el bien y la misericordia me seguirán todos los días de mi vida,
Y en la casa del Señor moraré por largos días.


You can see that tú is used. It makes sense in the context of the passage, which shows a loving god who is a great provider.

My question is whether it is always tú or if you sometimes see Ud. as well?
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
January 24th, 2018 at 11:40:12 AM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 807
Posts: 9715
Martin Buber (Hebrew: מרטין בובר‬; German: Martin Buber; Yiddish: מארטין בובער‎; February 8, 1878 – June 13, 1965) was an Austrian-born Israeli Jewish philosopher best known for his philosophy of dialogue, a form of existentialism centered on the distinction between the I–Thou relationship and the I–It relationship.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_and_Thou


In English at the time of the King James, English still used the familiar form "thou" which has since vanished from mainstream English. Since most English speakers are unfamiliar with "familiar " and "formal" forms of pronouns, they mistaken think "thou" is some kind of exalted word.

But the translators when faced with different names of God or Jesus that were formal or familiar in Hebrew or Greek would try and mimic the aspect in English. It's more difficult with modern English.

But I would certainly think they would follow the same protocol in Spanish translations of the bible.

There are seven proper names for God

YHWH The Tetragrammaton in Paleo-Hebrew (fl. 1100 bce – ce 500), Aramaic (fl. 1100 bce – ce 200), and modern Hebrew scripts.
In modern Jewish culture, it is accepted as forbidden to pronounce the name the way that it is spelled. In prayers it is pronounced Adonai, and in discussion is usually said as HaShem, meaning “The Name”. The word ceased to be spoken aloud by at least the 3rd century bce during Second Temple Judaism and vowel points were not written until the early medieval period.

Most modern Jews never pronounce YHWH but instead read Adonai ("My Lord") during prayer and while reading the Torah and as HaShem ("The Name") at other times. Similarly, the Vulgate used Dominus ("The Lord") and most English translations of the Bible write "the Lord" for YHWH and "the Lord God" for Adonai YHWH .

It is thought to be an archaic third-person singular imperfect tense of the verb "to be" (i.e., "[He] was being"). This agrees with the passage in Exodus where God names Himself as "I Will Be What I Will Be" using the first-person singular imperfect tense.

El
Eloah
Elohim, Elohai or Elohei ("My God")
El Shaddai
Tzevaot
Jah
January 24th, 2018 at 12:33:12 PM permalink
Wizard
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Member since: Oct 23, 2012
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Posts: 4363
At a forum I used to be active on there were frequent arguments on the fine points of Christianity argued between believers. I recall a huge one, that went on for years, was on the name of god and how it applied to baptism. I had enough of that topic to last several lifetimes.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
January 24th, 2018 at 3:55:56 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 807
Posts: 9715
See in this segment, John the Baptist is addressing the people using the formal "you". Even though he indicates that Jesus is ranked well above him (whose shoes I am not worthy to bear) he uses the familiar "you" when speaking to him. The Spanish translation follows the same format.

I have to admit that my Greek is over 40 years old, and I can't begin to remember verb tenses, so I looked them up.
υμας (hūmâs) means "you" formal
συ (sú) means "you" familiar

I know nothing about Hebrew at all, so I don't know if there is a familiar or a formal pronoun. I suspect there is because the more ancient languages have more structural complexity. Languages tend to lose structure as they gain vocabulary. Maybe Nareed went to Hebrew school.


11 I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance. but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire:
12 Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire.
13 Then cometh Jesus from Galilee to Jordan unto John, to be baptized of him.
14 But John forbad him, saying, I have need to be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me?
---------------
10 Y el hacha ya está puesta a la raíz de los árboles; por tanto, todo árbol que no da buen fruto es cortado y echado al fuego.
11 Yo a la verdad os bautizo con agua para arrepentimiento, pero el que viene detrás de mí es más poderoso que yo, a quien no soy digno de quitarle las sandalias; El os bautizará con el Espíritu Santo y con fuego.
12 El bieldo está en su mano y limpiará completamente su era; y recogerá su trigo en el granero, pero quemará la paja en fuego inextinguible.
13 Entonces Jesús llegó* de Galilea al Jordán, a donde estaba Juan, para ser bautizado por él.
14 Pero Juan trató de impedírselo, diciendo: Yo necesito ser bautizado por ti, ¿y vienes a mí?
---------------
11 εγω μεν βαπτιζω υμας εν υδατι εις μετανοιαν ο δε οπισω μου ερχομενος ισχυροτερος μου εστιν ου ουκ ειμι ικανος τα υποδηματα βαστασαι αυτος υμας βαπτισει εν πνευματι αγιω και πυρι
12 ου το πτυον εν τη χειρι αυτου και διακαθαριει την αλωνα αυτου και συναξει τον σιτον αυτου εις την αποθηκην το δε αχυρον κατακαυσει πυρι ασβεστω
13 τοτε παραγινεται ο ιησους απο της γαλιλαιας επι τον ιορδανην προς τον ιωαννην του βαπτισθηναι υπ αυτου
14 ο δε ιωαννης διεκωλυεν αυτον λεγων εγω χρειαν εχω υπο σου βαπτισθηναι και συ ερχη προς με

This section is from New Testament so Hebrew would be a later translation.
January 24th, 2018 at 6:27:28 PM permalink
Nareed
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 345
Posts: 12529
Quote: Pacomartin
11 εγω μεν βαπτιζω υμας εν υδατι εις μετανοιαν ο δε οπισω μου ερχομενος ισχυροτερος μου εστιν ου ουκ ειμι ικανος τα υποδηματα βαστασαι αυτος υμας βαπτισει εν πνευματι αγιω και πυρι
12 ου το πτυον εν τη χειρι αυτου και διακαθαριει την αλωνα αυτου και συναξει τον σιτον αυτου εις την αποθηκην το δε αχυρον κατακαυσει πυρι ασβεστω
13 τοτε παραγινεται ο ιησους απο της γαλιλαιας επι τον ιορδανην προς τον ιωαννην του βαπτισθηναι υπ αυτου
14 ο δε ιωαννης διεκωλυεν αυτον λεγων εγω χρειαν εχω υπο σου βαπτισθηναι και συ ερχη προς με.


It was all Greek to me :)
Fresh out of clues. Did you really expect anything?
March 18th, 2018 at 4:26:25 PM permalink
Wizard
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Member since: Oct 23, 2012
Threads: 198
Posts: 4363
For those who don't know, I recently spent a week in Barcelona. I'll write about it gradually. For now, let me comment on a couple words that I am stubborn about:

Bus. I was told they way they say it is in Spain is also "bus," but pronounced in a way that rhymes with moose.

Doughnut: I was told they use the same word, "doughnut."

You probably know this, but in Spain a tortilla is kind of like a quiche made of eggs and potatoes.

I do have a question. At the Barcelona casino they had a side bet in baccarat that paid as follows:

Dama y rey mismo color: 74 to 1.
Dama y rey distinto color: 29 to 1.

Based on the same side bet in the UK, what they mean by "color" is actually suit. So, if you wanted to add a pay for a king and queen of the same color but not the same suit, how would you say it in Spanish?

Thank you.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
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