Wizards 50th Birthday

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October 26th, 2014 at 4:12:41 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Can you do 9 mph over a 1 mile flat track? That would imply a rpm of close to 100.
October 26th, 2014 at 7:11:37 PM permalink
Wizard
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Quote: Pacomartin
Can you do 9 mph over a 1 mile flat track? That would imply a rpm of close to 100.


If more than 19% of the time on my ride today was taking breaks, then my riding speed would be 9 MPH or greater. However, I don't think I was at rest 19% of the time. Probably about 10%. Nevertheless, I'm confident I could get over 9 MPH on a flat surface at a temperature in the low 70s for the short term at least. This isn't a speed I could keep up for hours.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
October 26th, 2014 at 8:16:42 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
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Quote: Wizard
This isn't a speed I could keep up for hours.


I think Lance Armstrong keeps a cadence of about 100 rpm.

I realize that I have no experience at anything like this, but my friend Ace used to tell me that his 50 mile time was always 2.5 times his marathon time (out of dozens of times), usually 4 hours and 10 hours. He always said he couldn't run over 5 mph or the lactic acid buildup would kill him.

Presumably you are going to train up to 40 miles before the birthday bash. So that should give you a feel for the pain.

Bottom line is I can't find one blog on the web for someone who tried something like this on smaller than a 36" unicycle or one with gears.
October 26th, 2014 at 8:22:55 PM permalink
Wizard
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Quote: Pacomartin
I think Lance Armstrong keeps a cadence of about 100 rpm.

I realize that I have no experience at anything like this, but my friend Ace used to tell me that his 50 mile time was always 2.5 times his marathon time (out of dozens of times), usually 4 hours and 10 hours. He always said he couldn't run over 5 mph or the lactic acid buildup would kill him.

Presumably you are going to train up to 40 miles before the birthday bash. So that should give you a feel for the pain.

Bottom line is I can't find one blog on the web for someone who tried something like this on smaller than a 36" unicycle or one with gears.


Yes, I think if I can comfortably do 40 miles in Vegas I can do 50 in California.

I do like to be the first to do anything. I think I owe much of my success and fame to this spirit. If I can be the first documented case of doing 50 miles on a 29" unicycle or smaller, I'll be proud of that.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
October 26th, 2014 at 8:49:52 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
Posts: 8412
Quote: Wizard
If I can be the first documented case of doing 50 miles on a 29" unicycle or smaller, I'll be proud of that.


Well that's very inspiring.

The last bit of advice that I could find was that since you are not tackling hills, that you should stay with 89mm-110mm cranks. But it is harder to mount, so you have to practice with them. What are you using now?
October 26th, 2014 at 9:49:12 PM permalink
Wizard
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Quote: Pacomartin
Well that's very inspiring.

The last bit of advice that I could find was that since you are not tackling hills, that you should stay with 89mm-110mm cranks. But it is harder to mount, so you have to practice with them. What are you using now?


I don't have a ruler here, but comparing it to the size of a dollar bill, I'd estimate about 140mm. It could probably be argued I would go faster with shorter cranks, but then I would have a harder time with the hills in Vegas.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
October 26th, 2014 at 11:08:32 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
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Quote: Wizard
I don't have a ruler here, but comparing it to the size of a dollar bill, I'd estimate about 140mm. It could probably be argued I would go faster with shorter cranks, but then I would have a harder time with the hills in Vegas.


It sounds like 125 and 150 are standard sizes. I'm guessing you have 150's.
I was suggesting that you train with the longer cranks in hills, and then switch to shorter cranks when competing. Of course you need time to get used to them.

But it sounds like you intend to compete with the exact same equipment that you train with. The only advantage that you will have is less hills.


Quote: Reference
Crank size reference
26" (& 29") unicycles, 110 mm cranks make a great long distance machine on flat surface but very hard to idle, 125 mm cranks are smooth and a good street machine, 150 mm cranks are great for standard Muni riding and tricks work, 170 mm are for trials riders or mountain climbers, these give you the ability to go up almost anything!

36" Coker, 110 mm cranks, yes; you can put them on a 36" unicycle and they make an incredibly fast unicycle - on the "Ride across Minnesota" I rode with 110 mm cranks and could cruise at 17mph without too much difficulty - but my fractured scaphoid is testimony to my lack of control. 125 mm cranks create an extremely fast machine and gives some control for the experienced rider to idle. 150 mm cranks are standard and should be considered the minimum for all but experienced riders.


Hard to comprehend 17 mph on a unicycle.
November 1st, 2014 at 3:30:18 PM permalink
Wizard
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It is my plan to leave the steep hills alone and train on level and moderately steep terrain here in Vegas.

Today I did 21 miles in 3:25. That comes to 6.15 MPH. Not that fast but there were the usual hills and quite a few street crossings.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 4th, 2014 at 5:13:21 PM permalink
Wizard
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I did 18 miles today in 3:15 for a speed of 5.5 MPH. The reason for the slow speed I assume because the terrain was somewhat steep.
Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
November 4th, 2014 at 9:50:10 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 722
Posts: 8412
It's a shame you can't get a sensor with moving average data.