the death of coal?

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June 1st, 2022 at 12:04:47 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 25
Posts: 6162
Quote: rxwine
Can you close the doors of some rooms you don't use very often, and close the vents in them. Would that help?
I slows down the increase in the temperature inside for a little while. It also helps to close all the curtains. The fewer appliances running also makes less heat generation. It's amazing how much heat is blowing out from under our refrigerator. A lot of locals don't cook inside in the summer much at all if they can help it. I cooked a pot of beans last night in the garage, with the walk in door opened.

And even though this house is very well insulated, it is a short time until the temperature starts creeping up. And up. And usually we have a ceiling fan in every room spinning, they stop and the air goes still. Once that air mass warms, there's nothing that can be done with it until the power comes back on, or the outside temp drops at least 10-15 degrees. Until then, it continues to warm inside. A small generator will help the refrigerator save the food inside, but when its running, it's blowing hot air out the bottom through the coils., which heats the kitchen.

I don't want to get in a situation where we would have to go to a shelter to stay cool, it's not easy to keep my o2 running unless I'm at home with the power on. I also really don't want to be in a room full of other people that are probably health compromised like I am..
The last official act of any government is to loot the treasury. GW
June 1st, 2022 at 1:04:37 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 1049
Posts: 12414
Quote: petroglyph
I searching for a home generator. Not one big enough to run our main ac. 10.8kw, but one that will run a small window unit to keep at least one room bearable at 115 degrees outside temp. And maybe stop my freezer from melting. An extended power outage in this area will be seriously dangerous for old folks and those with compromised health.


Backing up home AC is very expensive.
MSRP Includes Transfer Switch - Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator with Whole House Switch WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7225 STARTING AT $4,899
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator with 16-circuit Transfer Switch WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7224 STARTING AT $4,797
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7223 $4,199
EcoGen 15kW Home Backup Generator WiFi Enabled MODEL #7163 $4,964 Transfer Switch, Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included

You can go half the kW for about half the price
Generac
POWERPACT 7.5KW HOME BACKUP GENERATOR Model #6998 $2,049 MSRP Includes Transfer Switch - Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included

Frankly we haven't lost power for more than an hour in decades. We just have a cheap gasoline generator from Home Depot in case of extreme emergency.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/WEN-Super-Quiet-Ultra-Lightweight-Gas-Powered-Recoil-Start-2350-Watt-Portable-Inverter-Generator-Fuel-Shut-Off-CO-Sensor-56235iX/319786181
$481 2350 Watt generator (gasoline) will give you enough power for a window unit, but you' will be driving back and forth to get gasoline every few hours.
June 2nd, 2022 at 3:31:27 AM permalink
odiousgambit
Member since: Oct 28, 2012
Threads: 135
Posts: 3649
I have started to include CNN in my channel surfing, to see if they are less biased now since they cleaned house. Not much sign of it.

anyway while surfing I saw they were going to have a segment on the high likelihood of blackouts in the midwest. Well, evidently, they decided the spin should be it is due to global warning. Not a word about the decisions to try to go green 'by force' ... in other words, force change by simply going to renewables only, ignoring evidence it will be inadequate.

So it looks to me that they simply don't want to criticize these bad decisions. They hope to fool the public, which is going to be suffering from the blackouts and looking for answers. Good luck with that, CNN

btw similar things are going on in the UK ... no luck there with the BS excuses I'm told
Politics! Imagine any other activity where it is OK to openly obsess over race and ethnicity
June 2nd, 2022 at 5:05:30 AM permalink
AZDuffman
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 135
Posts: 16971
Quote: odiousgambit
I have started to include CNN in my channel surfing, to see if they are less biased now since they cleaned house. Not much sign of it.

anyway while surfing I saw they were going to have a segment on the high likelihood of blackouts in the midwest. Well, evidently, they decided the spin should be it is due to global warning. Not a word about the decisions to try to go green 'by force' ... in other words, force change by simply going to renewables only, ignoring evidence it will be inadequate.

So it looks to me that they simply don't want to criticize these bad decisions. They hope to fool the public, which is going to be suffering from the blackouts and looking for answers. Good luck with that, CNN

btw similar things are going on in the UK ... no luck there with the BS excuses I'm told


At least nobody is watching that is already not woke brainwashed.
The President is a fink.
June 2nd, 2022 at 6:59:15 AM permalink
DRich
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 41
Posts: 3721
Quote: Pacomartin
Backing up home AC is very expensive.
MSRP Includes Transfer Switch - Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator with Whole House Switch WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7225 STARTING AT $4,899
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator with 16-circuit Transfer Switch WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7224 STARTING AT $4,797
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7223 $4,199
EcoGen 15kW Home Backup Generator WiFi Enabled MODEL #7163 $4,964 Transfer Switch, Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included

You can go half the kW for about half the price
Generac
POWERPACT 7.5KW HOME BACKUP GENERATOR Model #6998 $2,049 MSRP Includes Transfer Switch - Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included

Frankly we haven't lost power for more than an hour in decades. We just have a cheap gasoline generator from Home Depot in case of extreme emergency.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/WEN-Super-Quiet-Ultra-Lightweight-Gas-Powered-Recoil-Start-2350-Watt-Portable-Inverter-Generator-Fuel-Shut-Off-CO-Sensor-56235iX/319786181
$481 2350 Watt generator (gasoline) will give you enough power for a window unit, but you' will be driving back and forth to get gasoline every few hours.


I now live in Florida and power outages are not uncommon with the storms and hurricanes. I will probably just buy a small generator for my garage that I can hook up to the refrigerator/freeze and power a few fans. It seems the $500 price point will probably work for what I believe that I need.
We are all going to die, why procrastinate?
June 2nd, 2022 at 7:24:00 AM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 158
Posts: 15140
Quote: DRich
Quote: Pacomartin
Backing up home AC is very expensive.
MSRP Includes Transfer Switch - Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator with Whole House Switch WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7225 STARTING AT $4,899
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator with 16-circuit Transfer Switch WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7224 STARTING AT $4,797
Guardian 14kW Home Backup Generator WiFi-Enabled MODEL #7223 $4,199
EcoGen 15kW Home Backup Generator WiFi Enabled MODEL #7163 $4,964 Transfer Switch, Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included

You can go half the kW for about half the price
Generac
POWERPACT 7.5KW HOME BACKUP GENERATOR Model #6998 $2,049 MSRP Includes Transfer Switch - Installation, Taxes and Shipping Not Included

Frankly we haven't lost power for more than an hour in decades. We just have a cheap gasoline generator from Home Depot in case of extreme emergency.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/WEN-Super-Quiet-Ultra-Lightweight-Gas-Powered-Recoil-Start-2350-Watt-Portable-Inverter-Generator-Fuel-Shut-Off-CO-Sensor-56235iX/319786181
$481 2350 Watt generator (gasoline) will give you enough power for a window unit, but you' will be driving back and forth to get gasoline every few hours.


I now live in Florida and power outages are not uncommon with the storms and hurricanes. I will probably just buy a small generator for my garage that I can hook up to the refrigerator/freeze and power a few fans. It seems the $500 price point will probably work for what I believe that I need.


Longest my power has been out is about a day and half. There was an accident nearby, fuel fire burned up trees and several utility poles. I have solar and aside from regular fridge, a mini fridge that the solar can power. But I usually have extra ice in the freezer of the regular fridge to transfer to the lower if it comes to that. It didn't get super hot that day, so running a couple fans was all i needed.

Most of the power outages are rarely more than 2 hours from storms.
Pro-lifer eats meatball with entire human inside without noticing. "Yum Yum", he says.
June 3rd, 2022 at 3:09:19 PM permalink
rxwine
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 158
Posts: 15140
Quote: DRich
[

I now live in Florida and power outages are not uncommon with the storms and hurricanes. I will probably just buy a small generator for my garage that I can hook up to the refrigerator/freeze and power a few fans. It seems the $500 price point will probably work for what I believe that I need.


You have until June 10 to buy a generator without paying taxes, because Florida has an emergency preparation period. At least, I think generators are included.
Pro-lifer eats meatball with entire human inside without noticing. "Yum Yum", he says.
June 3rd, 2022 at 5:51:34 PM permalink
terapined
Member since: Aug 6, 2014
Threads: 54
Posts: 10312
Quote: rxwine
Quote: DRich
[

I now live in Florida and power outages are not uncommon with the storms and hurricanes. I will probably just buy a small generator for my garage that I can hook up to the refrigerator/freeze and power a few fans. It seems the $500 price point will probably work for what I believe that I need.


You have until June 10 to buy a generator without paying taxes, because Florida has an emergency preparation period. At least, I think generators are included.

I lived in FL 17 years. Rarely lost power. Huge storm, maybe lose power for an instant. Very frustrating when on a computer. Extended blackout rare. Usually due to a car accident at a transformer.
FL is not like Texas. Grid very reliable
Sometimes we live no particular way but our own - Grateful Dead "Eyes of the World"
June 3rd, 2022 at 11:05:33 PM permalink
Pacomartin
Member since: Oct 24, 2012
Threads: 1049
Posts: 12414
Quote: terapined

I lived in FL 17 years. Rarely lost power. Huge storm, maybe lose power for an instant. Very frustrating when on a computer. Extended blackout rare. Usually due to a car accident at a transformer.


I think a factor is simply how much electrical power is generated per person by instate generators. I'm only listing large population states because all states import electricity from other states. VT is a very small number because most of their electricity is from a big nuclear power plant in New Hampshire. Energy exporting states like West Virginia, Wyoming or Noth Dakota generate a lot of energy per capita since they are simply selling it to large metropolitn areas in other states.

But a large state is limited in some ways as to how much it can import from other states. These 11 states consitute roughly 60% of the nation's population.
  1. 4.9 Mwh/Year/Person CA
  2. 6.4 Mwh/Year/Person NY
  3. 6.6 Mwh/Year/Person NJ
  4. 10.3 Mwh/Year/Person OH
  5. 10.6 Mwh/Year/Person MI
  6. 11.2 Mwh/Year/Person GA
  7. 11.6 Mwh/Year/Person FL
  8. 11.9 Mwh/Year/Person NC
    12.1 Mwh/Year/Person U.S. average
  9. 13.5 Mwh/Year/Person IL
  10. 16.2 Mwh/Year/Person TX
  11. 17.7 Mwh/Year/Person PA
    PA has a sizeable business in building power plants to sell electricity to NY and NJ. PA amd IL also have a sizeable nuclear generating capacity.

    I feel that electricity in California is disproportionately expensive compared to other Western states simply because they don't produce very much. Normally they import a lot of electricity from hydrodynamic plants in Oregon, coal plants in Utah, nuclear plants in Arizona, and wind farms in Nevada, but when their is a multi state heat wave like in the summer of 2020 they have to resort to rolling blackouts.

    On August 14 and 15, 2020, the CAISO (California Independent System Operator) was forced to institute rotating electricity outages in California in the midst of a West-wide extreme heat wave. Following these emergency events, Governor Gavin Newsom requested the CAISO, California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) , and California Energy Commission (CEC) report on the root causes of the events leading to the August outages.

    The report was a long winded statement that summarized that you can't get electricity from a solar plant after the sun goes down and you can't get electricity from a wind plant when the wind isn't blowing. Also you can't buy electricity from other states if they are having the same heat wave because they need the electricity for their own residents.
    The nearby states generate enough electricity to keep their prices low and to sell some to California under normal circumstances if they are not in a heat wave.
    • 16.1 Mwh/Year/Person NM
    • 15.3 Mwh/Year/Person AZ
    • 15.1 Mwh/Year/Person WA
    • 15.0 Mwh/Year/Person OR
    • 13.0 Mwh/Year/Person NV
    • 11.3 Mwh/Year/Person UT

    Texas is somewhat unique in that they produce a lot of electricity, but they also use a lot of electricity in the state for industrial and commercial purposes. They are also on their own interconnection grid so they can't import a lot of electricity in times of emergency,

    Hawaii has completely unique problems since they don't have coal, nuclear or much natural gas and are very dependent on expensive oil which no one else uses. Electricity is far more expensive in Hawaii than in any other state. You would think that Hawaii would be very motivated to convert it's half a million automobiles to electric vehicles considering the short driving ranges (69% of population lives on Oahu) and the emphasis on environmental issues in the state, but the high electric prices may mean that hydrogen fuel vehicles like Toyota Mirai and the Hyundai Nexo may find a large role in the state.

    115 mile drive around Oahu
June 21st, 2022 at 9:13:34 PM permalink
petroglyph
Member since: Aug 3, 2014
Threads: 25
Posts: 6162
https://www.theepochtimes.com/netherlands-lifting-restrictions-on-coal-fired-power-stations-amid-drop-in-gas-supplies-from-russia_4546802.html?welcomeuser=1

"“This means that the coal-fired power stations are allowed to produce at full capacity again so that less gas is needed for the production of electricity by gas-fired power stations. This reduces the risk of gas shortages and makes it easier to fill the gas storage facilities in the Netherlands and Europe.”

Lucky they didn't tear down their coal fired plants.
The last official act of any government is to loot the treasury. GW
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